Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Single Piece Metal Door Frame Conducting Heat
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 > Single Piece Metal Door Frame Conducting Heat

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sgossman

perris, california

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Posted: 07/04/21 04:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am having what seems to be a unique issue per my own research.

The door frame of my trailer is built in such a way the metal extends from outside to inside. As such the heat it accumulates from outside is transferred inside. On hotter days its essentially a space heater, I can't even touch it for long without feeling like I am getting burned.

There are some things I have tried and others I have thought of but I am curious if anyone else has had a similar problem with perhaps a more elegant or simpler solution.

-I've tried putting a radiant barrier on the outside, covering the entire door and frame plus about 2 extra inches in all directions and the impact seems to have made a small difference overall but it seems air contact, not sunlight, is still an issue.

-I tried simply covering the outside frame with silicone but it seems this doesn't insulate well as the issue persists.

-I also tried applying these polyethylene foam pieces to various spots inside but its difficult to get total coverage. However where I have applied it has been quite effective, just difficult to work with and doesn't "form" to the frame very well.

The other ideas I have is to cover the outside portion of the frame with spray insulation and then cut to a more pleasing shape and then seal/pain it some how. My concern this isn't very weather resistant.

Another was to "break" this conductivity of heat by cutting the frame into an "inner frame" and "outer frame" so there is no direct physical contact to conduct the heat. However this would take some doing, likely compromise the door stability and I'm not entirely sure how much it would help in the end.


I've already sealed the door with weather stripping and caulk to an extreme degree. This is not an air flow or leakage problem. The door is sealed for air. I repeat, the door is sealed for air leakage. I'm sorry if this seems obnoxious but so far all research I have done just talks about weather stripping, caulk and air leakage. Air leaks are not the issue, I am 100% sure.



Here are some images to help illustrate.

As you can see the frame is one metal piece, extending from outside all the way to the inside, bringing in a lot of heat with it.
[image]

Here is a picture I took with my infrared camera. Any metal parts that extend from outside to inside are clearly hotter than the rest.
[image]

The part I circled here is on the metal door handle where I put a piece of the foam on. It definitely seems to be mitigating it but like I said this stuff doesn't form fit very well.
[image]

wildtoad

Blythewood, SC

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Posted: 07/04/21 04:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Is there anyway to prevent the outside of the door from getting direct sunlight? Perhaps add an awning? Park in shade?


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sgossman

perris, california

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Posted: 07/04/21 05:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Oh its completely blocked from direct sunlight. I have a giant approximately 8x5 piece of radiant barrier blocking it. Its very dry and has been 95+ for a while here so just ambient air is quite warm. Most of the trailer is also under the shade of a 3 trees.

bgum

South Louisiana

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Posted: 07/04/21 06:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Would a mister help?

QCMan

Independent Republic of Horry

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Posted: 07/04/21 07:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Maybe an increase in elevation?


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jdc1

Rescue, Ca

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Posted: 07/04/21 08:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

QCMan wrote:

Maybe an increase in elevation?


Big Bear is 15* cooler than Perris.

NJRVer

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Posted: 07/04/21 08:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You hit the nail on the head. You need a "thermal break" from outside frame to inside frame.
I never heard complaints from anybody before about heat transfer. If this were winter you would have ice on the inside of the frame instead of it being too hot.

Thermoguy

Graham, WA

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Posted: 07/05/21 09:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm just impressed you have a FLIR... [emoticon]

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 07/05/21 11:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Guess I never really considered this, although it seems like standard RV construction.
Don’t have any ideas other than keep it in the shade and realize you’re in a mobile box, not a home. They’re not exactly efficient.
However if it’s shaded it will never be hotter than ambient temps.


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sgossman

perris, california

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Posted: 07/05/21 12:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NJRVer wrote:

You hit the nail on the head. You need a "thermal break" from outside frame to inside frame.
I never heard complaints from anybody before about heat transfer. If this were winter you would have ice on the inside of the frame instead of it being too hot.


Yes, a thermal break. I've managed to keep it cool inside but this issue worries me how inefficient it all is. I don't expect proper "house" level insulation or R-levels but you can instantly feel how much hotter it is by the door.

When I'm outside for a while and I come back to the door its weird feeling the outside door handle be relatively cold.

The windows were built like the door as well but I just outright filled them with insulation and boarded them up. When it gets 100+ I can use my Flir heat camera and still see the window frame through 1 inch wood. I can even make out the other studs in the trailer through the walls.

Thermoguy wrote:

I'm just impressed you have a FLIR... [emoticon]

It was a wild shot, figured it would help with this trailer and the house as well which has its own insulation problems.
Its turned out to help quite a lot. Its amazing how many corners in the walls just hold heat due to poor air flow. Makes me wonder if rounded corners on drywall in houses help at all. The antenna handle and surrounding area in the ceiling of the trailer was a big offender as well, that was much easier to insulate though.

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