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Boon Docker

Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta

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Posted: 07/13/21 03:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Been using 1 cup Calgon, 1/2 cup laundry soap (about every third dump) for two decades and have had great success. Sensors have even worked great.

Lwiddis

Monterey, California

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Posted: 07/13/21 03:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When staying put for a while, I drop a pill for smell issues. Always “breaks up” on the drive to the dump.


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d1h

Indiana

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Posted: 07/13/21 08:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don't you need some sort of enzymes to break down the waste and toilet paper? Sort of the same principle as to why you put rid x in your septic tank at home.

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

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Posted: 07/13/21 10:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

d1h wrote:

Don't you need some sort of enzymes to break down the waste and toilet paper? Sort of the same principle as to why you put rid x in your septic tank at home.


nope. first most any toilet paper will disinegrate by itself in water. Not even a need for "RV" toilet paper IMHO. We've used Costco TP in the house and trailer for over a decade, never an issue. I have a short clear section on the macerator (dump at home) and I've never seen a piece of toilet paper enter the macerator that was more than maybe a few inches square. poof it's gone.

Next, you will be flushing all the stuff out, you don't need to turn it into something else. The waste will come out with the other fluids, especially if you have a inlet for a tank rinser.


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jbls

Eagar, AZ

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Posted: 07/14/21 12:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, I live full-time in my 32 foot Wanderer Wagon in an RV park in Arizona. I've been here a little over a year. I had issues with the tank plugging up and had to manually remove TP from the bottom of the tank. Real fun job.

The guys on either side told me to use RidX and a septic safe TP. So, after getting the tank emptied, I used a box of it and IT WORKED GREAT! There is only me so I have to dump about every two weeks. I clearly notice the difference--- TP and other waste is broken down. The liquid coming out of the tank is a much different color than before RidX. Actually, I mostly use generic RidX from Dollar General as it's half the price of the brand name and works just as well.

Cummins12V98

on the road

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Posted: 07/14/21 04:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use water and nice thick Charmin, never an issue full timing since 2011.


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Tvov

CT

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Posted: 07/14/21 05:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We are weekend campers. I don't add anything to the black tank while camping, except we do dump wash water from dishes into the black tank.

I do add chlorine when we get home after dumping. Splash of bleach... maybe 1/2 - 1 cup ... fill tank, let it sit for awhile (usually at least an hour), drain it. This keeps the camper from getting stinky when sitting in the hot summer sun between trips.


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Campinfan

Washtenaw County, Michigan

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Posted: 07/14/21 05:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use some chemicals...whatever I found a good deal on. I use them mostly to deodorize. I have also used the homemade remedies...dishsoap, laundry soap,Calgon, etc and they were fine too. Just easier to drop a packet into the toilet then to add a cup of this and a pinch of that.


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Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 07/14/21 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

d1h wrote:

Don't you need some sort of enzymes to break down the waste and toilet paper? Sort of the same principle as to why you put rid x in your septic tank at home.


No, rid x is a marketing sales ploy to scare (sell) you into buying their product. Just like the days before Internet (must be true if it is on the Internet) TV ads huckstered a lot of bogus products.

Septic system basics HERE

"The Septic Tank – The heart of your septic system:
The septic tank holds the waste that leaves your home via the main drain pipe. This tank is often made of concrete and is buried in the ground near the home. The size of the septic tank installed in your system is based on the amount of waste it is expected to process. Local building codes will often specify the volume of the septic tank by number of bedrooms, or occupancy of a structure. A four bedroom household of five people will require a larger septic tank than that of a small two bedroom home.

All raw liquid or solid household waste moves by gravity to the septic tank where the flow is slowed to allow the waste treatment process to begin. Once in the tank, the waste is allowed to stand and separate into three layers over a period of about three to five days. The heavy solids settle to the bottom of the tank as sludge, a large middle layer of liquid effluent, and a top layer of floating oil, grease and light solids called scum. During this holding period in the septic tank, billions of anaerobic (without air) enzymes and bacteria work to digest and convert the scum and sludge into liquefied waste. As more waste water enters the tank from the home, the liquid effluent is forced from the tank and into the next component of the septic system, the drain field. A sanitary tee pipe and baffles in the tank prevent solids from flowing out with the liquid effluent into the drain field.

The Drain Field (or Leach Field) – An active septic system filter:
A septic drain field is essentially a group of long, perforated pipes that are installed in gravel filled trenches buried a few feet beneath the topsoil. This system of drain pipes carry the cloudy liquid effluent from the septic tank and allow it to slowly trickle out through the gravel trenches and into the ground. As the effluent flows through the drain (leach) field, a new group of aerobic (with air) enzymes and bacteria begin to further break down the liquid into nutrients and base elements. Over time, a healthy layer of microbe filled bio material forms in the bottom of the trench, acting as another filter of germs and other pollutants for the liquid effluent.

The Soil – The final filter:
The purpose of the septic system’s drain field is to deliver the waste water to the soil where the final treatment process occurs. The soil filters the effluent while more oxygen dependent (aerobic) enzymes and bacterial action further break down chemicals and germs. If the system contains too much water or liquid, the good enzymes and bacteria will not have enough oxygen to effectively work, and the septic system may clog. In the soil the remaining liquid dissipates through evaporation into the atmosphere and, by filtration, further into the ground before it enters the water supply.

A Recap of the Sewage Treatment Process:

Solid and liquid waste is allowed to stand in septic tank for 3-5 days. Scum (Oil & Grease) floats and solids settle into Sludge.
Enzymes & bacteria break down the settled solids turning it into liquid, called “liquid effluent”.
Liquid effluent flows to the drain field (or leach field) and seeps into the surrounding soil.
The soil treats effluent and removes harmful bacteria, viruses, and nutrients. (Bacteria and enzymes in soil break down & remove most contaminants from wastewater before it reaches groundwater)"


I would recommend you read SEPTIC TANK FACTS AND FOLKLORE

"Starting a new system

Most of this folklore is believable because it contains elements of
truth. The concept of seeding a septic tank is partially true.
Septic systems are biological systems and must have bacteria to work. However, no special seeding is necessary to get them started.
The simple act of using the system will provide all the bacteria necessary to make the system function well.
Yeast, manure,
and especially dead cats will not help develop the
colony of bacteria in the tank any faster.

Additives for old systems

Septic system folklore doesn't stop with seeding a new septic system. Many products are sold that claim to make old systems like new. Other products claim to eliminate the need to pump out the septic tank. These products usually contain yeast, bacteria, enzymes, or chemical degreasers. People often ask if additives can reduce or eliminate the need to pump a septic tank. It's a good question, too. So far, no additive has been proven effective in a controlled scientific study

"


Holding tanks do not need anything and neither does septic systems, water is your best friend in both cases.

And for the record, my home does indeed have a septic system, they do not need anything to "start or maintain" them, just a periodic pump out by the honey differ wagon is all it takes for maintenance and just the act of using it will restart the process.. Everything it needs is contained within your own waste..

Lynnmor

Red Lion

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Posted: 07/14/21 09:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:



Holding tanks do not need anything and neither does septic systems


Both of them stink, so I use chemicals in the RV and step aside when having my septic tank pumped.





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