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wanderingaimlessly

Buggs Island lake

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Posted: 07/15/21 08:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A CPAP is not too much of a hindrance, most only draw a max of 70 watts with the humidifier, considerably less without one. and a 2 battery set even of group 27 rv/marine batteries will handle overnight. you can either run off 12 volts directly using a 12 volt power cord, or on 120 volt from campground supply or an inverter if shore power isn't available.
If you are running from the batteries you will need to recharge the next day either by running a generator, running the drive engine, or by solar.
On the sprinter recommendations, I would agree if that is within your budget. If not, then a small class B+ or C on either a Ford or Chevy chassis may be more realistic, plenty of them around especially if you are looking at 10 years old.

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 07/15/21 08:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If the only reason you are thinking of getting an RV is due to the cpap, just know that many tent campers have battery setups for that. You don't need an RV to camp with a cpap - just a battery that can run it through the night and a way to recharge it the next day (generator or solar). You can find examples of setups on many tent camping forums.

If you want an RV for more than the cpap, then I suggest you consider what you want to do with it. For some, RVing means sightseeing and traveling. For others, it is simply camping off the ground. And for others, it is a combination of the two. Knowing how you want to use it will help you decide what you really need. Understanding that will help you wade through a lot of the suggestions and recommendations offered.

For example, if you will just be camping off the ground, then a toad is likely not necessary (unless you tend to drive to distant trailheads for hiking, etc).

If you plan on sightseeing and traveling, then where you choose to stay will make a difference. If you stay at RV parks with hookups, then you don't need to worry about battery size because you can run the cpap off shore power. If you want to stay at dry (no hookups) campgrounds, then the battery size is much more important.

Once you know how you'll use the RV, you can better decide what will work best.

Size of the camper will get a ton of comments. Some folks believe in getting the biggest possible. Others want the smallest. My class C is 21ft and works great for me, two dogs, two cats, and a parrot. A friend has a sunrader class C - it is on a toyota chassis, so is smaller. Its size better allows her to drive into cities, etc. If you stay at RV Parks, size won't be limiting. If you have specific campgrounds you enjoy, size can make a difference.

Fresh water and holding tank sizes are also a consideration. Again, if you stay at RV Parks, you'll have hookups, so it won't matter. But if you dry camp, then it is a bigger consideration. My clipper has a 40gal fresh tank and 20gal each grey and black. I can go two weeks (using campground showers) without needing to dump or refill. In contrast, my folding trailer has a 20gal fresh tank (holds about 18), a cassette toilet and a 20gal grey tank. The clipper works great for traditional camping because I can just go and not worry. The trailer works well for sightseeing/travel because there are usually facilities to dump and refill nearby or I can overnight at an RV Park between stops.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

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Posted: 07/15/21 08:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CPAP: I use two small 12 amp/hour gell cel 12 volt batteries, connected in parallel (12 volts, 24 amp hours) in a sturdy carrying bag that I leave "on charge" using a "battery minder" smart trickle charger. I connect my ResMed power supply/converter to the battery and to the ResMed CPAP. I don't use the humidifier, which gives much longer battery life. There are many other "travel power" battery systems that will power your CPAP when 120vac is not available. Normally you will have 120vac when your RV is connected to "shore" (camp) power.

* This post was edited 07/15/21 09:20am by Bordercollie *

garyhaupt

Penticton, BC..land of wine, sun, retirees....

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Posted: 07/15/21 09:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As was mentioned...rent some first..get the one that will work best for you.

I too am in BC (Penticton)...if i can help? always glad to.

Gary Haupt
[email protected]


I have a Blog..about stuff, some of which is RV'ing.

http://mrgwh.blogspot.ca/

Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

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Posted: 07/15/21 09:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Many forest RV campsites have only a few or no sites with electrical, fresh water or sewage hookups. Being able to camp for up to three days and use only self-contained battery power, propane, and water supply becomes important.
That's where your knowledge about using RV's generator, house battery(s), charger/converter and related switches, etc. becomes essential.

mockturtle

AZ

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Posted: 07/15/21 11:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

And tent camping is not allowed in some areas of BC where there is bear activity.


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Sjm9911

New Jersey

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Posted: 07/15/21 05:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Also, if intrested in having a group to go with or to, i know a lot of the pop up people join https://www.sistersonthefly.com/ . Not sure if they are active up north. But they may be a good resource for you.


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Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

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Posted: 07/18/21 07:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Forgot to mention personal safety. There are certain camp spots that are known for local addicts and others stealing camping equipment and possibly robbing or hurting vulnerable looking RV'ers, especially elderly people alone. You will need to camp near others, instead of in an isolated spot off by yourself. If someone tries to visit with you, uninvited, or asks for money, etc., follow your gut, say that you are going to visit your friends in a nearby campsite, etc. Best to camp in areas that have police periodically driving through or available by calling 911 on your cell phone. An air horn is good to scare off bad guys, attract attention or maybe scare an animal.

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