Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Technology Corner: RV navigation systemsl
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Technology Corner

Open Roads Forum  >  Technology Corner

 > RV navigation systemsl

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/21/21 12:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have the garmin RV890 had a previous version years ago.

Advantage:
after entering trailer and TV info will help keep you from going down roads you shouldn't and won't route you on those roads
Lots of info on campgrounds, RV related stuff etc.
Great integrated optional rear view/backup camera and input for a optional camera

Disadvantage:
Google maps or our car display does a better job showing traffic and google does a fantastic job of direction display and test especially if you can link it to your TV nav display. But google looses some of it's value if your in areas with poor or no cell reception.



for planning, we still use microsoft streets and trips. Old but still works well for us.


2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2015.5 Denali 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison passed on to our Son!


fyrflie

Martinez, CA. USA

Senior Member

Joined: 07/31/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/22/21 09:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Going to try to use my iPad for navigation.
Just got a Garmin stand alone GPS device that connects to my iPad via Bluetooth.
Then use any navigation app you want. I am using Maps.me.
All this without the need for cell service or a $400 gps device.

agesilaus

North Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 07/22/21 12:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs wrote:

We have the garmin RV890 had a previous version years ago.

Great integrated optional rear view/backup camera and input for a optional camera



The comments I've seen on the camera for the 890 say it is not very good, the one one the older model was said to be better


Arctic Fox 25Y Travel Trailer
2012 Ford F-350 4WD Lariat 6.7L
Straightline dual cam hitch
400W Solar with Victron controller
Superbumper


ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 07/22/21 12:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

agesilaus wrote:

ktmrfs wrote:

We have the garmin RV890 had a previous version years ago.

Great integrated optional rear view/backup camera and input for a optional camera



The comments I've seen on the camera for the 890 say it is not very good, the one one the older model was said to be better


I had a RV 700 something and I'd say the camera for the 890 is much better. However, on the older garmins the camera had an option of a extension cord that allowed the camera transmitter to be located on the trailer tongue for long trailers. The camera for the rv890 so far doesn't have that option, so it could be an issue for long trailers. The RV890 camera does have better resolution than the one for my 700.

Scottiemom

Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 09/09/2003

View Profile



Posted: 07/26/21 07:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm presently using a new Garmin 785 RV GPS. It has a built in camera and it has lane warnings if I get too far to the side. . . also a front collision warning. Pretty cool.

I have had 2 Rand McNally RV GPS's and love them, especially their address book. But unfortunately, one died completely and I had it replaced under warranty. Then the other larger 7" also died. The smaller one (replacement) works "most" of the time, but still freezes occasionally and has to be restarted. I run that and my Garmin together. I also will use Waze on my phone.

It's just me, so I cannot be messing with the GPS going down the road. I'm not good with the Google maps on my phone but have used it to verify roads when I'm stopped.

I like the Garmin for navigation and the Rand McNally when it works.

Dale


Dale Pace
Widow of Terry (Teacher's Pet)

2014 Ford Flex
2004 R-Vision Trail-lite 213 (MinnieMee)
Fulltimed for 15 years, now living in Florida

http://www.skoolzoutforever.blogspot.com/
Where are we?


whjco

Lexington, KY

Senior Member

Joined: 01/26/2007

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/01/21 07:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LouLawrence wrote:

Throw out the Garmin style GPS. Your smartphone and Google Maps and/or WAZE is all you need. Additionally, the information on Google Maps is years ahead of anything available on the standalone GPS's. As an example, I-70 here in Denver was closed for the weekend and Google Maps showed that closure and the correct route to avoid it. This would be impossible with a Garmin.


We traveled out west earlier this year and many places had spotty or no cell service. If you're going to use only a smartphone for navigation then you'd better use a program like CoPilot or Sygic where larger map databases can be loaded directly onto the phone so that a cellular connection isn't needed.

As to the traffic reports, all three of my various Garmins have a data link to my smartphone and receive immediate traffic updates so it IS possible to get dynamic traffic updates with a Garmin GPS. I have a Garmin DriveAssist 50 in one vehicle and a Garmin DriveAssist 51 in another. I use a Garmin dezlcam 785 LMT for my RV. It's a GPS that's designed for commercial vehicles and I have it because I drive charter motor coaches but it will support multiple vehicle configurations.. All three of these GPS units not only access dynamic traffic data but all three also have built-in dash cams.

An added bonus is that I have Garmin's free Basecamp program installed on my PC. The program lets me design trips and then upload them directly to my Garmin so the GPS will then contain custom designed routes already installed and ready to go. If I encounter unplanned construction or traffic delays, the Garmin will automatically plot a detour around it if I want the device to do so.

And then there's that problem when you're using a smart phone for navigation in a big city with numerous, fast approaching set of instructions and then you get a text or phone call at the worst moment possible. I have the above programs installed on my cell phone but they're only there for backup purposes or if I'm traveling on a boat or train and want to know my location.

* This post was edited 08/01/21 07:59pm by whjco *


Bill J., Lexington, KY
2006 Starcraft 2500RKS 25' Travel Trailer
2015 Ram 2500 Big Horn 6.7 Cummins.

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/01/21 07:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

whjco wrote:

LouLawrence wrote:

Throw out the Garmin style GPS. Your smartphone and Google Maps and/or WAZE is all you need. Additionally, the information on Google Maps is years ahead of anything available on the standalone GPS's. As an example, I-70 here in Denver was closed for the weekend and Google Maps showed that closure and the correct route to avoid it. This would be impossible with a Garmin.


We traveled out west earlier this year and many places had spotty or no cell service. If you're going to use only a smartphone for navigation then you'd better use a program like CoPilot or Sygic where larger map databases can be loaded directly onto the phone so that a cellular connection isn't needed.

As to the traffic reports, all three of my various Garmins have a data link to my smartphone and receive immediate traffic updates so it IS possible to get dynamic traffic updates with a Garmin GPS. I have a Garmin DriveAssist 50 in one vehicle and a Garmin DriveAssist 51 in another. I use a Garmin dezlcam 785 LMT for my RV. It's a GPS that's designed for commercial vehicles and I have it because I drive charter motor coaches but it will support multiple vehicle configurations.. All three of these GPS units not only access dynamic traffic data but all three also have built-in dash cams.

An added bonus is that I have Garmin's free Basecamp program installed on my PC. The program lets me design trips and then upload them directly to my Garmin so the GPS will then contain custom designed routes already installed and ready to go. If I encounter unplanned construction or traffic delays, the Garmin will automatically plot a detour around it if I want the device to do so.

And then there's that problem when you're using a smart phone for navigation in a big city with numerous, fast approaching set of instructions and then you get a text or phone call at the worst moment possible. I have the above programs installed on my cell phone but they're only there for backup purposes or if I'm traveling on a boat or train and want to know my location.


my experience as well on the Garmins. Yes, maps may not be as current as Google, and a few other things, but we very often travel in spots where we go 100+ miles with NO cell reception, and frankly the Garmin direction map and directions are as good as google, sometimes better. "Turn right at the next stop light on x street just after the McDonalds on the right" Or on freeways showing all the lanes you can use to turn and on a big screen. And the RV Garmins make it easy to find RV related items.

whjco

Lexington, KY

Senior Member

Joined: 01/26/2007

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/01/21 07:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs wrote:

We have the garmin RV890 had a previous version years ago.

Advantage:
after entering trailer and TV info will help keep you from going down roads you shouldn't and won't route you on those roads
Lots of info on campgrounds, RV related stuff etc.
Great integrated optional rear view/backup camera and input for a optional camera

Disadvantage:
Google maps or our car display does a better job showing traffic and google does a fantastic job of direction display and test especially if you can link it to your TV nav display. But google looses some of it's value if your in areas with poor or no cell reception.



for planning, we still use microsoft streets and trips. Old but still works well for us.


You may want to download Garmin's free Basecamp program for your route planning. Once you plot a route (or multiple routes) you can then directly upload them to your Garmin device. You can also determine the vehicle configuration in Basecamp so that it will also take weight/height/length/width into consideration. One tip, if you do install Basecamp, attach your Garmin to your computer and then run Garmin Express and make sure that you have the latest map database installed on your GPS. Once this update is performed, leave your GPS attached (for the first local map install) and then also install the map database to your computer. This will allow the program to run much faster and you don't need to have your Garmin device attached to your computer to access the map database.

whjco

Lexington, KY

Senior Member

Joined: 01/26/2007

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 08/01/21 08:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ktmrfs wrote:

whjco wrote:

LouLawrence wrote:

Throw out the Garmin style GPS. Your smartphone and Google Maps and/or WAZE is all you need. Additionally, the information on Google Maps is years ahead of anything available on the standalone GPS's. As an example, I-70 here in Denver was closed for the weekend and Google Maps showed that closure and the correct route to avoid it. This would be impossible with a Garmin.


We traveled out west earlier this year and many places had spotty or no cell service. If you're going to use only a smartphone for navigation then you'd better use a program like CoPilot or Sygic where larger map databases can be loaded directly onto the phone so that a cellular connection isn't needed.

As to the traffic reports, all three of my various Garmins have a data link to my smartphone and receive immediate traffic updates so it IS possible to get dynamic traffic updates with a Garmin GPS. I have a Garmin DriveAssist 50 in one vehicle and a Garmin DriveAssist 51 in another. I use a Garmin dezlcam 785 LMT for my RV. It's a GPS that's designed for commercial vehicles and I have it because I drive charter motor coaches but it will support multiple vehicle configurations.. All three of these GPS units not only access dynamic traffic data but all three also have built-in dash cams.

An added bonus is that I have Garmin's free Basecamp program installed on my PC. The program lets me design trips and then upload them directly to my Garmin so the GPS will then contain custom designed routes already installed and ready to go. If I encounter unplanned construction or traffic delays, the Garmin will automatically plot a detour around it if I want the device to do so.

And then there's that problem when you're using a smart phone for navigation in a big city with numerous, fast approaching set of instructions and then you get a text or phone call at the worst moment possible. I have the above programs installed on my cell phone but they're only there for backup purposes or if I'm traveling on a boat or train and want to know my location.


my experience as well on the Garmins. Yes, maps may not be as current as Google, and a few other things, but we very often travel in spots where we go 100+ miles with NO cell reception, and frankly the Garmin direction map and directions are as good as google, sometimes better. "Turn right at the next stop light on x street just after the McDonalds on the right" Or on freeways showing all the lanes you can use to turn and on a big screen. And the RV Garmins make it easy to find RV related items.


Another plus is that you can download Garmin's free POI Loader program and install it on your computer. Then you can install custom POIs on your Garmin. I upload things like speed/stop light cameras, RV dump sites, Walmarts, etc. Many custom POI databases can be downloaded from www.poifactory.com.

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 08/02/21 09:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

whjco wrote:

ktmrfs wrote:

We have the garmin RV890 had a previous version years ago.

Advantage:
after entering trailer and TV info will help keep you from going down roads you shouldn't and won't route you on those roads
Lots of info on campgrounds, RV related stuff etc.
Great integrated optional rear view/backup camera and input for a optional camera

Disadvantage:
Google maps or our car display does a better job showing traffic and google does a fantastic job of direction display and test especially if you can link it to your TV nav display. But google looses some of it's value if your in areas with poor or no cell reception.



for planning, we still use microsoft streets and trips. Old but still works well for us.


You may want to download Garmin's free Basecamp program for your route planning. Once you plot a route (or multiple routes) you can then directly upload them to your Garmin device. You can also determine the vehicle configuration in Basecamp so that it will also take weight/height/length/width into consideration. One tip, if you do install Basecamp, attach your Garmin to your computer and then run Garmin Express and make sure that you have the latest map database installed on your GPS. Once this update is performed, leave your GPS attached (for the first local map install) and then also install the map database to your computer. This will allow the program to run much faster and you don't need to have your Garmin device attached to your computer to access the map database.


I do use basecamp. We do lot's of trips on FS roads so with my Garmin Montana I use basecamp and also have the topo 24K maps installed.

And the custom POI lists are nice for any GPS unit. Actually I can load custom POI's into our Denali factory Nav unit as well as our Acura MDX factory Nav unit.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Technology Corner

 > RV navigation systemsl
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Technology Corner


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.