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RLS7201

Beautyful Downtown Gladstone, MO

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Posted: 07/30/21 10:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dougrainer wrote:


While you can remove that screen, it is much easier to replace the Valve. Also, that screen will only get clogged if you have a problem with the Compressor failing and throwing debris thru the system. Also, when I State Capacities, that is NOT my guess but the specs from the maker of the AC system for a Roadmaster chassis. I have the specs for Roadmaster/Spartan/Freightliner/Ford/Workhorse/Chevy, Gas and Diesel. Maybe this link will help people out. Doug

https://comfortairgr.com/wp-content/uplo........ant-Charge-Information-R134A-Systems.pdf


Doug make a point about the compressor failing but there are other reasons for the screen to get choked. I.E acid in the system and the desiccant sack in the dryer ripped and allowing desiccant into the system. No matter, always change the receiver/dryer.

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dodge guy

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Posted: 07/30/21 12:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sounds like it’s low on refrigerant. You would need gauges to accurately see the pressures and determine how much it needs.


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dougrainer

Carrolton, Texas

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Posted: 07/30/21 03:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dodge guy wrote:

Sounds like it’s low on refrigerant. You would need gauges to accurately see the pressures and determine how much it needs.


From the EXPERTS on the link I posted. Gauges are good but you CANNOT accurately determine the correct charge. As I stated, TOO MUCH coolant will cause low output as well as LOW coolant. Gauges cannot be that accurate to determine that. You can get close but close will not give you the BEST cooling other than an exact charge. If I was paying somebody, I want the BEST not close. Doug

From the link.

the only way to be certain of an exact charge is to fill an empty system with the
specified amount of R-134a refrigerant.

dougrainer

Carrolton, Texas

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Posted: 07/30/21 03:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Last, When you had Freon 12 you could use the sight glass of the Dryer and when the bubbles quit you were pretty darn close to the correct charge. With 134a, you will always have Bubbles with the correct charge. Doug

dodge guy

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Posted: 07/30/21 04:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dougrainer wrote:

dodge guy wrote:

Sounds like it’s low on refrigerant. You would need gauges to accurately see the pressures and determine how much it needs.


From the EXPERTS on the link I posted. Gauges are good but you CANNOT accurately determine the correct charge. As I stated, TOO MUCH coolant will cause low output as well as LOW coolant. Gauges cannot be that accurate to determine that. You can get close but close will not give you the BEST cooling other than an exact charge. If I was paying somebody, I want the BEST not close. Doug

From the link.

the only way to be certain of an exact charge is to fill an empty system with the
specified amount of R-134a refrigerant.


A good AC guy knows how to read gauges (and I am one of those people). You have to know outside temp and humidity and have a chart to compare that to the pressures on your gauges as well as the vent outlet temperature. It can be done with the right person. Sadly not many like that left anymore!

ernie1

Sacramento,California,USA

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Posted: 07/30/21 08:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I concur with Dodgeguy's reply. That's the way I was taught by my refrigeration instructor who was also a mechanical engineer.

buystockinfun

California

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Posted: 07/30/21 09:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'll have to have somebody troubleshoot it probably going to need a new dryer and I guess I'm just going to guess an expansion valve if it has one and then completely flushed and then refilled. I suppose there's a chance that it's either too high or too low on refrigerant but without draining it doing any kind of cleaning that needs to be done however y'all do that and then refilling it. Not going to do all that without testing it in terms of the dryer and stuff first. I assume that's what's a professional would do anyway. Temperatures only getting to about 62° most of the time maybe a little lower on the cooler day and the low side doesn't change at all which doesn't seem from everything I'm hearing to be correct. So probably something wrong. The guy that told me he seen him take 10 lb also said that the dryer if it was going bad would be all froze up and I haven't seen that I haven't seen anything on that dryer at all in terms of moisture.

But if everything was good but levels. Wouldn't we see the low side increase or decrease in pressure?

wa8yxm

Davison Michigan (East of Flint)

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Posted: 07/31/21 06:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When it is 85 it comes out 63... Normal operation for the new refrigerante systems (what is that R-134A) the older Freon (R-12) systems got colder


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Rick Jay

Greater Springfield area, MA

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Posted: 07/31/21 12:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

buystockinfun,

I'm sorry to hear of your A/C woes, hopefully things will be fine soon.

I do have to say, though, as I read through this thread, that there are parts of your posts which suggest that you know "just enough to be dangerous", as they say. LOL A/C is not difficult work, but it IS precise work. And you can cause some expensive damage to components if procedures aren't followed properly. Proper equipment, gauge set, accurate thermometers and if possible, having the pressure/temperature/humidity charts for the system you're working on, make it easier to properly diagnose the system. As has been pointed out, too much refrigerant decreases system efficiency, so it's a very delicate balance.

I believe you mentioned several times about "draining" the system. It's very important that the system be evacuated in a controlled manner. Not just "drained" as the term implies. If you just open a schrader valve and let the refrigerant out, it'll take a lot of the system oil with it. The proper oil charge in the system is very important as well. Each component that is removed will remove some of the oil with it. That oil should be measured upon removal, and an equal amount installed upon assembly. If you're going to flush the entire system anyway, then it doesn't matter much as you'll be starting from fresh with the oil charge.

IF you think the system is overfilled now, I'd put some gauges on it, try to find the proper charts for your system and see how it performs based on the charts. Check the air temp leaving the vents in the moho. While releasing R-134 into the atmosphere is prohibited by law, IF you can figure out a way to slowly release some of the refrigerant, then you can stop and watch the temp in the vents. If it goes down (colder), you probably do have too much refrigerant in the system. If it goes up, you might not have enough. If it stays the same, try releasing a bit more. Of course could have other problems. But seeing as it might be overcharged, the cheapest and easiest route at this point is to slowly reduce the charge while watching the effect on outlet temps. This will take a while as you need to give some time for the system to stabilize. Even before you start doing anything, you have to let the system run for a while to stabilize the temperature of the ducting/vents etc.

If all else fails with no improvement, then you'll be where you're headed now. Opening the system, replacing some common components, flushing the system, adding oil and recharging. Again, keep everything clean. Once the system has been flushed and reassembled, pull a vacuum on the system and let it stay for a couple of hours to make sure there are no leaks.

Good Luck, I hope you find the source of your problem.

~Rick


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buystockinfun

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Posted: 08/05/21 04:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well I'm in a standstill till I get home so I will update everyone when I can get professional eyes on this or dig into it a little more where I'm not on the side of the road..

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