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3 tons

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Posted: 07/30/21 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What mostly typical per enquiries of this nature is:

A) Non-adopters who justify (often, preference) why they haven’t adopted a certain technology…
B) Experienced Adopters…

As with most other evolutions in automation (dishwashers, garage door openers, et al), this is Standard Procedure.

3 tons

HMS Beagle

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Posted: 07/30/21 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If solar eliminates the need for a genset, it isn't just free, you are paid to take it. For my situation, it eliminated the need for a second bank of batteries, cost less, and will last far longer. So the payback was immediate. Not having to listen to the drone of a genset is priceless.


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D.E.Bishop

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Posted: 07/30/21 09:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'll join those who like having solar and would inclue it in a new rig. During the last 18 or so months, my rig was in storage without any hookups. I have visited it frequently and the controller has typically read 13.8 volts. So for storage absolutly fabulous. Water consumption is about average. When visiting I run genny after checking batteries, after that I turn on the tv while I spend a hour or so dusting and running the 12vdc appliances etc. Always have fully charged batteries.

We have spent ten days in mostly sunny weather in a partly shady site without hookups and used power like we would have in a full hookup site. Did not have to use genny for routine living. We have a 300watt inverter so when wife did her hair we ran the genny for about a hour total dry and curl time.

I love the darn thing and will as soon as I can, up grade to 400 watts and four GC2 batteries.

* This post was edited 07/30/21 10:30am by D.E.Bishop *


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mbloof

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Posted: 07/30/21 09:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

IMHO: Frankly it comes down to personal choice and use patterns.

If we consider ONLY what might come with a RV from the factory, the furnace, fantastic fan and water pump are potentially the largest power draws.

How much power you use and for how long you use it dictates how much power storage you need in the camper.

As a example, lets say that you don't ever use ANY of the 3 devices above and only use the LED lights, sensors and fridge. (all of which use very little 12VDC power) A single type #24 deep cycle battery could be more than enough energy storage for WEEKS of dry camping.

However, in the real world most of us make use of ALL the systems that our RV's come with. Many of us like to charge/power our cell phones, tablets, laptops and other devices as well as all the systems that come with a new RV.

From personal experience in 40F weather 100AH of battery is barely enough for 2 nights of camping in a RV with my personal energy use pattern.

If I wish to dry camp for longer periods of time then the 100Ah provides I have a few choices to make. Ether I have to change my use pattern to use less energy or add additional energy storage and/or have a method of recharging the RV battery(s).

The recharging methods that many RV owners use are: solar, generator and rewire truck+camper to utilize trucks alternator to recharge the RV battery(s).

In a RV: power, water, propane and holding tanks are limited resources. How each of us decide to manage those resources is a personal decision.


- Mark0.

Sandia Man

Rio Rancho, NM

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Posted: 07/30/21 09:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Solar is no doubt part of a multi-pronged solution for successfully RVing off the grid, we use all our rig's amenities as if plugged into shorepower when off the grid, as such generator use is key to being 100% self-contained. Having no constraints while RVing off the grid makes every where you park a destination, never too hot or too cold, whether parked in direct sun or totally shaded, or simply have 12 volt reserves that are waning, press a single button and all is well.

For us sitting in the dark using the sparsest amount of 12 volt power to get by when we just payed dearly for fuel to go RVing certainly doesn't endear us to this endeavor. We have monitors for both AC and DC voltages, actual current draws, and consumption rates among other details, go to know but again no reason for alarm when you have the ability to power your entire RV and replenish your 12 volt reserves by pressing a single switch from the interior of rig.

valhalla360

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Posted: 07/30/21 10:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3 tons wrote:

What mostly typical per enquiries of this nature is:

A) Non-adopters who justify (often, preference) why they haven’t adopted a certain technology…
B) Early Adopters…who justify (often, preference) why they have adopted a certain technology.

3 tons


Your argument runs both ways.

I've been with and without solar. It's still very much how you use the RV if it makes sense to get solar.

OP: Stick to the facts. Run the numbers and let that guide your choice.


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3 tons

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Posted: 07/30/21 12:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, as to your modification to point ‘B’, it’s these ‘early adopters’ with their gained cumulative total number of years (if not even decades!) of actual hands-on usage that can also state their preference as ‘experienced based’….

One could argue that some folks who have solar may not see an appreciable benefit - fair enough on that, but my best guess is that those of us who do benefit are folks that tend not to regularly camp under trees, thus I’m drawn to conclude the disparity of which you point too might best be attributed to either preferences in camping styles, too few of panels (or possibly a strictly series panel configuration?), or insufficient battery storage to carry them over to the next harvest opportunity - JMHO…FWIW, a system can be easily designed (and usually are) to tolerate a limited amount of shading, and what often happens is a reduction (if not the elimination…) of shading during those peak harvest hours…Either way, more good info for the “to go solar, or not to go solar” grist mill [emoticon]

3 tons

Buzzcut1

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Posted: 07/30/21 05:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cost: when I did my install in 2015 (or there about) 200 watts of solar with hardware and controller ran me $345. I did the install myself


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mbloof

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Posted: 07/31/21 08:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Buzzcut1 wrote:

cost: when I did my install in 2015 (or there about) 200 watts of solar with hardware and controller ran me $345. I did the install myself


Thankfully the cost of solar has gone down considerably.

My first 100W panel in late 90's early 00's cost ~$700! Not to many years before I bought solar was costing ~$10 a watt. I don't recall the cost of the controller. I did the complete install myself.

As I recall from those early years was that during the summer months while parked in full sun my single 100Ah FLA was fully recharged at least by Noon or 2PM each day.

At the time a EF1000is Yamaha inverter generator cost ~$800. While I would eventually end up getting a Yamaha generator (for the winter months) I have no regrets on investing in solar.

Obviously everybody's MMV.


- Mark0.

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Posted: 07/31/21 08:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP is still here ,reading each and every reply!

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