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 > Why do I keep blowing out tires on my truck?

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Devo the dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 05:00pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Devo the dog wrote:

Overinflation.


All that would do is wear out the center of the tire. He said he religiously inflates to 80 towing.


10-4 12V. Another useless response by Devo. Surprised he didn’t attribute it to being a Chrysler product!


You know for a fact that his gauge is accurate?

BTW, now that you pointed out that my post is useless and you're surprised that I didn't attribute the problem because it's a Chrysler product, you can never again call yourself unbiased and level headed.

Devo the dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 05:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dodge guy wrote:

It’s possible they are overinflated.

According to Grit dog and the 12V owner, your post is useless.

Devo the dog

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Posted: 08/01/21 05:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

https://bouldertire.com/blog/view/how-bad-is-it-to-overinflate-your-tires
https://despairrepair.com/overinflated-tires-what-can-happen-and-how-to-fix-it/
https://itstillruns.com/dangers-overinflating-vehicle-tires-5784335.html

Etc. Etc.

If the tires are overinflated and the sidewalls are too stiff, the risk goes up. Is that the root cause? Maybe not. I would suspect excessive heat build up on the right rear caused by something else. Too much heat at the rim is added stress to the sidewall. If the tire is already overinflated from a bad gauge (I've had them and have throw them away), the tire's life could be reduced. Sooner or later, any kind of road debris is going to cause it to give out.

Of course, all useless information according to Grit Dog and the 12V owner. They know everything.

JRscooby

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Posted: 08/01/21 05:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Devo the dog wrote:

https://bouldertire.com/blog/view/how-bad-is-it-to-overinflate-your-tires
https://despairrepair.com/overinflated-tires-what-can-happen-and-how-to-fix-it/
https://itstillruns.com/dangers-overinflating-vehicle-tires-5784335.html

Etc. Etc.

If the tires are overinflated and the sidewalls are too stiff, the risk goes up. Is that the root cause? Maybe not. I would suspect excessive heat build up on the right rear caused by something else. Too much heat at the rim is added stress to the sidewall. If the tire is already overinflated from a bad gauge (I've had them and have throw them away), the tire's life could be reduced. Sooner or later, any kind of road debris is going to cause it to give out.

Of course, all useless information according to Grit Dog and the 12V owner. They know everything.


How much over inflated will a tire need to be to do damage? More than the gauge would be off I'm sure. And just 1 tire?
Over inflated would mean less sidewall flex, and sidewall flex is the main source of heat in a tire.
But no matter what the pressure, every curb strike is just like a note at the bank, it will come due. That and the OP says it is the right rear, which is the most likely to hit a curb.

joshuajim

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Posted: 08/01/21 05:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Possible that the RR brake Is “hanging” and causing excessive heat in the tire.


RVing since 1995.

Cummins12V98

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Posted: 08/01/21 07:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

joshuajim wrote:

Possible that the RR brake Is “hanging” and causing excessive heat in the tire.


If so the pads would be gone and backing plates would be gouging the rotors.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 08/02/21 01:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

joshuajim wrote:

Possible that the RR brake Is “hanging” and causing excessive heat in the tire.


For 3 sets of tires?


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dodge guy

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Posted: 08/02/21 05:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

dodge guy wrote:

I’ll second the only rotate front to back. That’s all I do. Going side to side can cause damage because the tire has a memory and when it spins in one direction for thousands of miles and you switch it to rotate in a different direction then it came cause the rubber and steel to fatigue sooner. Bias plus never had that issue.


That is the biggest falsehood I’ve heard posted on here in a while! Which says alot considering this is rvnet, the land of wacky theories and methodologies! Lol

I find it hard to believe you even said that. Aren’t you a Dodge mechanic? You should know better.


And while I don’t usually google stupid stuff like this. It got the better of me.
Couldn’t find a single “recommendation” that didn’t promote side to side rotation as a viable option.

ALTHOUGH, to your point, I also generally only rotate straight front to back unless I am trying to correct some unusual tread wear.
What is viable, is on a rwd vehicle, the drive axle tread will feather in the opposite direction of the steer axle tread. Front to back only rotation keeps the tread feathering in check.
Or in the case where rear tread wear isn’t greater than front, and tires are all equal wear not necessitating putting the best tread on the right rear to help it “catch up”, I may rotate side to side only, which has the same effect as front to back but by different means wrt correcting feathering of the tread.
This is more pronounced in vehicles with heavy axle loads, aggressive tread and or more torque/aggressive acceleration. And much less noticeable in the opposite conditions.


I guess you know far more than I do.
Sounds like you are the final answer to any questions asked here. We’ve finally found “the guy,” LOL
My recommendations are accurate. And yes changing the direction of rotation of a tire after thousands of miles can and does make a difference!


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CapriRacer

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Posted: 08/02/21 06:04am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Allow me to explain the side to side vs cross rotation thing - from a tire engineer's perspective.

First the front tires do different things than the rear tires - so they wear differently.

There is a slight difference in what happens on the left side vs the right side, but not nearly the amount compared to the front/rear thing.

Ergo, it is OK to rotate tires front to rear, and it would be slightly better to cross rotate.

But in the past, there was a specific recommendation from tire manufacturers to only do front/rear rotation. That's because in the early days of steel belted radial tires, the adhesion of rubber to steel wasn't very good and small separations would appear adjacent to the steel wire on one side. The thought was that by keeping the direction of rotation the same, the risk of the separation occurring in the other side was reduced.

I never bought into the theory because I this is all about torque and tires experience both braking torque and acceleration torque.

Well, those days are long gone and rubber to steel adhesion is sooooo much better. Separations around the steel wire are non-existent in normal production. Yeah, there are sometimes where the adhesive materials aren't up to par, but those are relatively rare and caused by a problem in mixing the rubber. A change in rotation practice won't cure that!


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JRscooby

Indepmo

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Posted: 08/02/21 06:22am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CapriRacer wrote:

Allow me to explain the side to side vs cross rotation thing - from a tire engineer's perspective.

First the front tires do different things than the rear tires - so they wear differently.

There is a slight difference in what happens on the left side vs the right side, but not nearly the amount compared to the front/rear thing.

Ergo, it is OK to rotate tires front to rear, and it would be slightly better to cross rotate.

But in the past, there was a specific recommendation from tire manufacturers to only do front/rear rotation. That's because in the early days of steel belted radial tires, the adhesion of rubber to steel wasn't very good and small separations would appear adjacent to the steel wire on one side. The thought was that by keeping the direction of rotation the same, the risk of the separation occurring in the other side was reduced.

I never bought into the theory because I this is all about torque and tires experience both braking torque and acceleration torque.

Well, those days are long gone and rubber to steel adhesion is sooooo much better. Separations around the steel wire are non-existent in normal production. Yeah, there are sometimes where the adhesive materials aren't up to par, but those are relatively rare and caused by a problem in mixing the rubber. A change in rotation practice won't cure that!


I heard this rotation advice when I bought my first radial truck tires. I bent a piece of steel, welded a handle to it, to brand a arrow in the sidewall so I could mount with the same rotation even after capping them. Used until I retired, still in "might use for something" scrap steel bin.

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