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wing_zealot

East of the Mississippi

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Posted: 08/09/21 07:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use a piece of HDPE on each corner about 12 x 12 inches square and 3/4 inch thick. Can’t get much more minimal than that (pretty easy storage).

alexey75

Nova Scotia

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Posted: 08/09/21 08:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Second Chance wrote:

Would something like this be too pricey?

Anderson blocks

We just use 2 x 10 pressure treated wood cut to 12" lengths... but we have a different situation, too.

Rob


Yes, too pricey and too heavy. I have watched some review a while ago, and I remember each peace is like 8 pounds or so.

Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 08/10/21 06:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

alexey75 wrote:

Second Chance wrote:

Would something like this be too pricey?

Anderson blocks

We just use 2 x 10 pressure treated wood cut to 12" lengths... but we have a different situation, too.

Rob


Yes, too pricey and too heavy. I have watched some review a while ago, and I remember each peace is like 8 pounds or so.


I use whatever scrap lumber I have laying around.

I just weighed one piece I have which is a 2x8 at 12", weight is 5 lbs.

5 lbs is not all that much weight to move, handle or store.

I typically use 2x6 pieces that are about 10" in length under my stabilizers and that works fine even on a sandy area.

Blocks of leftover wood are cheap, effective and will last longer than any plastic blocks with a given amount of weight on them.

If weight is a huge issue, you do realize that can also be fixed?

[image]

Yep, a spade drill bit can be used to drill through or drill partial holes in a diamond pattern and not affect the strength of the board very much but yet remove some weight..

Something else to consider, pressure treated lumber when first bought is heavily laden with moisture as part of the treating process so those boards start out very heavy. As the board dries (after you buy it) it just needs some time sitting in the sun for a few weeks to loose the extra moisture back to the same weight as non treated lumber. Pressure treating plants don't bother removing the excess moisture before shipping to the lumber yards.

Wood (even treated) is a natural product, plastic, not so much.

alexey75

Nova Scotia

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Posted: 08/10/21 07:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

alexey75 wrote:

Second Chance wrote:

Would something like this be too pricey?

Anderson blocks

We just use 2 x 10 pressure treated wood cut to 12" lengths... but we have a different situation, too.

Rob


Yes, too pricey and too heavy. I have watched some review a while ago, and I remember each peace is like 8 pounds or so.


I use whatever scrap lumber I have laying around.

I just weighed one piece I have which is a 2x8 at 12", weight is 5 lbs.

5 lbs is not all that much weight to move, handle or store.

I typically use 2x6 pieces that are about 10" in length under my stabilizers and that works fine even on a sandy area.

Blocks of leftover wood are cheap, effective and will last longer than any plastic blocks with a given amount of weight on them.

If weight is a huge issue, you do realize that can also be fixed?

[image]

Yep, a spade drill bit can be used to drill through or drill partial holes in a diamond pattern and not affect the strength of the board very much but yet remove some weight..

Something else to consider, pressure treated lumber when first bought is heavily laden with moisture as part of the treating process so those boards start out very heavy. As the board dries (after you buy it) it just needs some time sitting in the sun for a few weeks to loose the extra moisture back to the same weight as non treated lumber. Pressure treating plants don't bother removing the excess moisture before shipping to the lumber yards.

Wood (even treated) is a natural product, plastic, not so much.


Yes, I thought about drilling some holes, not sure how much of the difference it will be.
I can take one peace, weight it before and after and decide if it worth it [emoticon]

rbpru

North Central Indiana

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Posted: 08/13/21 11:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In 7 years or camping I have never has a situation where the stabilizer would not extend far enough. In soft round a 12" x 12" x 1/4" plywood square would not do the job.


Twenty six foot 2010 Dutchmen Lite pulled with a 2011 EcoBoost F-150 4x4.

Just right for Grandpa, Grandma and the dog.


Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 08/13/21 01:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rbpru wrote:

In 7 years or camping I have never has a situation where the stabilizer would not extend far enough. In soft round a 12" x 12" x 1/4" plywood square would not do the job.


I would concur with your experiences.

But, for some reason folks are scared of the weight of a piece of wood or have been extremely over hyped and over marketed to believe their is always some new fangled super improved lighter weight more expensive product that they must have or buy.

joshuajim

Mojave Desert

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Posted: 08/14/21 08:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here’s a pic of my 5-7-9 blocks (depending on which way you turn them). They are hollow and have minimal internal framing so they are light.

[image]


RVing since 1995.

CavemanCharlie

Storden,MN

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Posted: 08/18/21 06:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rbpru wrote:

In 7 years or camping I have never has a situation where the stabilizer would not extend far enough. In soft round a 12" x 12" x 1/4" plywood square would not do the job.



A few weeks ago I was at a campground I like but, I got stuck into the last spot available. I had to use everyone one of my Lynx Levelers under the wheels on one side of the TT to get it level. There was no way the stabilizer was going to touch the ground on that side. Because I was out of blocks I used the spare tire under the back stabilizer to take up the space. I just didn't put the front one down. It worked OK for the week that I was there.

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