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 > Tires - The 10 Year Rule

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KendallP

Probably the office

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Posted: 09/23/21 11:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

path1 wrote:

.

You're a man of few words, path1

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Cheers,
Kendall

1986 Winnebago Chieftain 22RC


ferndaleflyer

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Posted: 09/24/21 08:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My friend had a blow out on a rear in his class C. It tore out the wheel well, destroyed the cabinet above it, and caught the wiring and pulled it right out of the walls. What a mess. Had to leave it in Michigan for awhile but his insurance paid to repair it + brought it home.

Desert Captain

Payson

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Posted: 09/24/21 09:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain,
Did your insurance cover a large percentage of that damage?"


Yes, Geico was awesome. The adjuster came out and guesstimated the damage to the coach at around $1,000. He wrote me a check on the spot to pay for the blown tire {$250} and gave me choices as to where to take the rig for repairs.

After their initial inspection the dealers service department uncovered a great deal of additional damage which bumped the repair costs up to $4,181. Geico immediately authorized that amount, less my $500 deductible and in 10 days I had the coach back, good as new.

The blowout and two other tires were all about 5.5 years old and I had Discount inspect and air up all 6 tires the day before our trip. They checked out fine with plenty of tread and no signs of any issues. We made it to our destination {about 100 miles} and on the return trip I went to the nearest Discount Tire store and replaced all three of the 5.5 year old tires, the other three being only a year old. It was my bad losing track of the older tires DOT codes.

Admittedly Arizona is a tough environment on all tires but these had been meticulously maintained and always run at the correct psi for the loads they carried. Obviously opinions vary but IMHO if your tires are over 5 years old you are rolling the dice... place your bets.

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2oldman

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Posted: 09/24/21 11:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

KendallP wrote:

Others replace the steers every 5 and the drives every 10.
Steers don't last longer?

KendallP

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Posted: 09/24/21 01:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

It was my bad losing track of the older tires DOT codes.

IMO, Michelin makes the best all season crossover / SUV tire money can buy. The Defender LTX M/S. They're what I run on the DW's Highlander. New, they're 10.5/32 deep. I change 'em out at around 6/32 or so as winter approaches. An example of me erring on the side of caution where my wife and kids are concerned. I want to minimize hydroplaning.

But their big, Class A tires have a terrible reputation. Not sure whether or not that carries over to smaller Class C tires.

So your codes showed 5.5 years at the time of the incident? Or...?

KendallP

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Posted: 09/24/21 01:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

KendallP wrote:

Others replace the steers every 5 and the drives every 10.
Steers don't last longer?

I'm guessing that was rhetorical?

Because I was merely stating what I've seen in my research.

It's not that the steers wear out faster. The reason to change out the steers earlier than the drives, is you're much less likely to lose control with a loss of a single drive tire on a dually motorhome than you are the loss of a steer tire. And changing a single pair of tires early offers a lot of safety bang for the buck... or at least... more peace of mind.

Now there are those who have seen plenty of damage caused by a blown drive tire. But this is less of a safety issue and more of an insurance claim issue... so long as your tire doesn't cause harm to anyone else on the road.

Desert Captain

Payson

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Posted: 09/24/21 01:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"So your codes showed 5.5 years at the time of the incident? Or...? "

Yes, the three oldest were all 5.5 years old with 4/32" of tread and looked fine and all three were on the rear. I normally start shopping at five years but as noted, my bad, just lost track of how old they were getting. When I buy new tires I always have them put on the front and rotate the fronts to the rear. As noted in a subsequent post losing a rear is bad but a blowout on one of the fronts has a lot more potential for disaster.

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KendallP

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Posted: 09/24/21 02:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

"So your codes showed 5.5 years at the time of the incident? Or...? "

Yes, the three oldest were all 5.5 years old with 4/32" of tread and looked fine and all three were on the rear. I normally start shopping at five years but as noted, my bad, just lost track of how old they were getting. When I buy new tires I always have them put on the front and rotate the fronts to the rear. As noted in a subsequent post losing a rear is bad but a blowout on one of the fronts has a lot more potential for disaster.

[emoticon]

Roger that.

I didn't realize you had already been on a 5 year maximum plan. I thought you started that subsequent to your incident.

Seems like you're giving yourself a pretty good beating when most don't replace tires earlier than 6 or 7 years... and many go to 10... and some even longer.

If anything, a blowout at 5 1/2 years would make me question the tire quality much more than my change-out plan.

dougrainer

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Posted: 09/24/21 03:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Michelin guidelines.

1." Keep five years in mind

After five years or more in use, your tires should be thoroughly inspected at least once per year by a professional.

2. Ten years is a maximum

If the tires haven't been replaced 10 years after their date of manufacture, as a precaution, Michelin recommends replacing them with new tires. Even if they appear to be in usable condition and have not worn down to the tread wear indicator. This applies to spare tires as well".

That said, AGE is not as much a concern as how often the tires are used. Tires have emmolients(lube) in the rubber. When tires are regularly driven those emmolients stay distributed thru the entire rubber. When they SIT for long periods(trailers and Boat trailers more common), the emmolients dry out and cause certain areas of the rubber to dry and have small cracks thru the tread. So, if you have a 7 year old RV or CAR and have less than 10k miles on it, REPLACE THE TIRES AS THEY ARE NOT SAFE. I replace my 1975 Corvette tires every 7 years which only has 31k original miles. I don't want to risk a blow out caused by drying out of the tires. Doug

KendallP

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Posted: 09/24/21 04:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dougrainer wrote:

Michelin guidelines.

1." Keep five years in mind

After five years or more in use, your tires should be thoroughly inspected at least once per year by a professional.

2. Ten years is a maximum

If the tires haven't been replaced 10 years after their date of manufacture, as a precaution, Michelin recommends replacing them with new tires. Even if they appear to be in usable condition and have not worn down to the tread wear indicator. This applies to spare tires as well".

That said, AGE is not as much a concern as how often the tires are used. Tires have emmolients(lube) in the rubber. When tires are regularly driven those emmolients stay distributed thru the entire rubber. When they SIT for long periods(trailers and Boat trailers more common), the emmolients dry out and cause certain areas of the rubber to dry and have small cracks thru the tread. So, if you have a 7 year old RV or CAR and have less than 10k miles on it, REPLACE THE TIRES AS THEY ARE NOT SAFE. I replace my 1975 Corvette tires every 7 years which only has 31k original miles. I don't want to risk a blow out caused by drying out of the tires. Doug

Yep. You said almost exactly the same thing 5 years ago in that thread I referenced in the O.P.

In fact, I'm going to add your pdf to it for the benefit of future readers.

However, it seems to be general tire specific. I wonder if commercial truck tires are made any differently. Some people seem to suggest that they are more robust than your average Honda car tire. At 99 lbs a piece, it sure seems like they may be. That said... they also undergo more severe punishment.




Posted By: dougrainer on 05/18/16 02:37pm

Tires should be replaced if 7 years or older. NO DOUBT ABOUT IT.
IF you purchase Tire/Wheel ESC protection, guess what? IF your tires are older than 7 years, that protection will not pay for any tire problems as they will state, the tires are too old for proper usage. That is in the small fine print [emoticon] They state they are not in business to replace old marginal tires regardless of the Tread left on them. I replace my 1975 Corvette tires every 5 to 7 years, even tho the Car has only 29,000 miles on it. Having a blow out while hot rodding around and the possible damage to the car body is not worth the risk for me. Doug

below is from a Tire Rack seller website. This is for just CAR tires that do not have the stress that RV tires would have.

While American driving conditions don't include the high-speed challenges of the German Autobahn, Chrysler, Ford Motor Company and General Motors have joined their European colleagues by recommending that tires installed as Original Equipment be replaced after six years of service.

Read this link.

http://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Documents/2014_Tire_Safety_SYM_Panel_4b_Kane.pdf
.

* This post was edited 09/24/21 04:40pm by KendallP *

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