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 > Should I cover my tires?

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NamMedevac 70

Reno

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Posted: 11/03/21 05:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For many years I covered the TT tires with cloth tire covers when setting outside on storage lots in very hot Texas sun and periodically applied 303 protectant to them. Never had any cracks or dry rot and towed the TT all over western states and Rockies. Except at the beginning with Goodyear tires I used Maxxis tires always.

The task of covering my tires took only a few minutes and applying 303 protectant was fun and satisfying to all the Jo's out there.

* This post was edited 11/03/21 06:18pm by NamMedevac 70 *

Cummins12V98

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Posted: 11/03/21 06:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My DRW Truck and RV are both in the sun year round. NEVER have I covered a tire and NEVER have I had a checked/cracked tire. Buy quality tires and don't worry about it.


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Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 11/03/21 07:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wildtoad wrote:

Well it may be “Old wives tale” here is what Goodyear states for storing. You choose what parts you may or may not want to use.

storing your vehicle properly helps protect your tires.

• Keep your vehicle in a cool, dry storage area out of direct sunlight and UV rays.
• Unload your vehicle so that minimum weight is on the tires.
• Inflate your tires to recommended operation pressure plus 25%, but don’t exceed the rim manufacturer’s inflation capacity.
• Thoroughly clean your tires with soap and water before storing them to remove any oils that may have accumulated from the road.
• Move your vehicle at least every three months to help prevent cracking and flat-spotting, but avoid moving it during extremely cold weather.
• Place your vehicle on blocks to remove the weight from the tires. If the vehicle can’t be put on blocks, make sure the storage surface is firm, clean, well-drained and reasonably level.


Yeah, putting on blocks? [emoticon]

I would expect that coming from a manufacturer that doesn't wish to pay for warranty replacement in case of irate customer.. All they have to do is pull out the fine print that states the nonsense above and they are free and clear of any and all defects since the customer failed to do any one of the items in the list.

Listen, vehicles of all types and sizes sit outdoors ALL the time.

Vehicles sit outdoors all the time with weight on the tires.

Vehicles sit outdoors with varying tire pressures.

Vehicles sit outdoor all the time unwashed.

Vehicles sit outdoors all the time for more than 3 months in cold and hot weather..

AND very few if any of those vehicles will ever experience a tire blowout due to never following that list..

And by the way, flat spotting goes away after a few miles and unless you flat spotted by allowing the tire to go completely flat (IE rim on the ground), no damage is going to happen..

You follow those rules, you must not have much to do in life..

I don't "baby" things like tires, they are expendable wear items and giving them baths and blocking them up every night will not give one second more life to them but it will eat up your personal time in doing so.

What next? Perhaps we should all wax the underside of the RV? Maybe tell the RV a bedtime story? Tuck it in and say it's prayers?

NamMedevac 70

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Posted: 11/03/21 08:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Think you may be over doing it here Jo or whatever as in over the top. My minor no worry chores were absolutely no inconvenience or real expense to me John but thank you for your in depth thoughtful well meaning RV experience for. And yes I do have a lot of time on my hands for fishing, camping, RVing and other frivolous activities as a retired and disabled vet since 2000. Thank you for your tax dollars and cheers to the brave

* This post was edited 11/03/21 09:03pm by NamMedevac 70 *

wildtoad

Blythewood, SC

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Posted: 11/04/21 06:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailor, we’ll I for one DO have lots of free time (isn’t that the idea behind retiring?), didn't mention blow outs, didn’t state or imply the Goodyear provided procedures were to be done every night, did not imply that all the steps were essential. If someone wants to extend the life of the tires on on their RV, following the advice of the manufacturer makes sense to me, especially considering the cost of new ones.

Spending an additional 10-15 minutes preparing my RV for storing it for months is time well spent, in addition to the time needed to winterize. Your mileage may vary.


Tom Wilds
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pitch

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Posted: 11/04/21 06:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Look at all the people saying yes. Without exception from lower latitudes with higher temperatures and more direct prolonged sun.
Those in more moderate climate are ambivalent at best.
I have a '39 Ford 9N. Has Firestone tires that were mounted in 1939. One of the front single rib tires may also be original.
They are weather checked, have cracks,but still function as designed.
Tires on Rv's trailers and motorhomes have a recommended drop dead life of five years.
I can't imagine that modern tires would self destruct from sun rays in five yearswhen 80 year old rubber formula has kept my tractor tires in shape for 82.

Now if you have parked your trailer on a permanent site covering may have some slight advantage. Non use is as big a killer of a tire as any other abuse.

JIMNLIN

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Posted: 11/04/21 06:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good point.
Every tire mfg recommendation on the subject I've read say about the same thing as Goodyear Tire.

Our trucks don't sit for 5-7 months a year with max loads on them like our RV trailers and expect them to last 6-7 years.

My rv trailer sits in a shed with 1" crusher run with the tires on 2"X 8" wood from around OCT 1st to around some time in mid April. I use 16" LT E tires and get 50k-55k miles and around 7+ years of service.

There is nothing wrong with following tire mfg recommendations on tire storage. If you don't feel the need for following them or don't want the added complexity of doing so, no one is going to think badly of you for your decision not to use those recommendations.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

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dedmiston

Coast to Coast

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Posted: 11/04/21 07:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don't forget to change the air in your tires every month. Old air is the silent killer. [emoticon]


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Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 11/04/21 08:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wildtoad wrote:

Gdetrailor, we’ll I for one DO have lots of free time (isn’t that the idea behind retiring?), didn't mention blow outs, didn’t state or imply the Goodyear provided procedures were to be done every night, did not imply that all the steps were essential. If someone wants to extend the life of the tires on on their RV, following the advice of the manufacturer makes sense to me, especially considering the cost of new ones.

Spending an additional 10-15 minutes preparing my RV for storing it for months is time well spent, in addition to the time needed to winterize. Your mileage may vary.


I have retired, have lots of "free time" but I still do not wash my tires, put them to bed or put the trailer up on blocks.

Those are all outdated wives tales from a century ago when tires were not very good and made before carbon black was introduced to the tire building process.

The truth to tires is they are a "consumable" item.

Tires on RVs get a bad rap because folks forget just how old the tires are since they often age out before 1 or 2 32nds of an inch wears off the tread and they look like new after 10 yrs.

Put it another way, as an industry average vehicles are warranted in 12,000 mile/ 1 yr increments as an average daily driver.

Typical vehicle tire warranties are rated in miles due to tread wear. Typical warranties are 40K-80K.

80K warranty and you average 12K per yr means the tires will be 6.6 yrs old..

Reality is, I have never, ever seen more than 45K out of a set of vehicle tires.. Meaning I exchange my vehicle tires every 3.75 yrs at 12K..

But in the past, I typically drove 20K+ miles per yr for work meaning I was replacing vehicle tires every 2 yrs..

My vehicle tires never had a chance to age out, instead the tread was worn off before the tires had a chance to rot off.

Yes, it is a shame to trash 7-10yr tires that have 90% of the tread left, but the tire carcass has aged out and is no longer safe..

The best advise on RV tires is to air them up to sidewall pressure before storing for 6 months. They will lose 1 to 2 PSI per month on average.

That's it, nothing else needs to be done, replace them after 6 yrs regardless of how pretty they look..

After 40 yrs of owning and driving vehicles I have lost two vehicle tires and both of those were from unavoidable junk like nails and bolts on the road.

20 yrs of towing a trailer, have lost zero tires due to them rotting from sun damage.

Had 1 tire on my 10K flatbed trailer that broke a belt internally (sun doesn't shine were the belt broke)and that was most like due to multiple severe overloads last summer hauling 10+ loads 9K of firewood plus 4K in tractor plus the 2.4K of the trailer (15.4K lbs each load).

If it makes you feel good to put it on blocks, slather goopy stuff on them, cover them with covers and over pressure them by 25% then by all means go ahead.. But, it only makes you feel good and does not help the tires..

And I would question the overpressure by 25%.. That ultimately will over stress and stretch the tires and once stretched the rubber and belts strength will be compromised and never go back to their original state without damage.

cummins2014

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Posted: 11/04/21 09:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NamMedevac 70 wrote:

For many years I covered the TT tires with cloth tire covers when setting outside on storage lots in very hot Texas sun and periodically applied 303 protectant to them. Never had any cracks or dry rot and towed the TT all over western states and Rockies. Except at the beginning with Goodyear tires I used Maxxis tires always.

The task of covering my tires took only a few minutes and applying 303 protectant was fun and satisfying to all the Jo's out there.


I too use 303 on my tires , mostly to make them look good, keeping them that nice black look , not a fan of dull looking tires on any vehicle or RV . Now as far as the old wife's tale as far as covering, probably , same as sitting batteries on cement . I don't really care one way or the other .

Here is the reason I cover my tires on my fifth wheel tires when not in use . If I happen to leave the covers off for a few days they start getting a brown tint to them, more on the side that gets the most exposure to the sun ,the other side is more shaded where I park my fifth wheel beside my house . So when I get home from a trip the tires ,and wheels are cleaned ,and covered, they remain nice ,and black , plus the wheels ,and the tires remain clean , one less thing to do as far getting ready to go on the next trip . So I keep them covered for that reason .

If I am at an RV park for any length of time , especially if its dirt or gravel , they get covered for the same reasons as above ,keeping them clean , and from not getting that brown tint to them .

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