Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Is there a Class C that can be driven into sketchy terrain?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > Is there a Class C that can be driven into sketchy terrain?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Prev
VA-Apraisr

glen allen, VA

Senior Member

Joined: 12/23/2004

View Profile



Posted: 12/05/21 05:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Mine is a 2004 Fourwinds Ford V10 E450 with Quigley conversion. They put I believe a 3" lift at the time and oversized tires for better clearance. I put a 2" spacer between back dually tires so I can air down and not "kiss" the sidewalls. I carry an air compressor. Would have a winch, however, I have a beach cart on the front end for surf fishing. Manual locking hubs with dana 60 axle. It's been bullet proof for over 100k miles. Having 4x4 is really essential if you have heavy angles/ditches and need pulling power of front tires. I like all the info PNichols mentioned and have most in my RV as well. Also a 40' long tow strap rated for 30,000lbs. Do your research and build your DREAM!!!

pnichols

The Other California

Senior Member

Joined: 04/26/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 12/05/21 05:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

VA-Apraisr wrote:

Mine is a 2004 Fourwinds Ford V10 E450 with Quigley conversion. They put I believe a 3" lift at the time and oversized tires for better clearance. I put a 2" spacer between back dually tires so I can air down and not "kiss" the sidewalls. I carry an air compressor. Would have a winch, however, I have a beach cart on the front end for surf fishing. Manual locking hubs with dana 60 axle. It's been bullet proof for over 100k miles. Having 4x4 is really essential if you have heavy angles/ditches and need pulling power of front tires. I like all the info PNichols mentioned and have most in my RV as well. Also a 40' long tow strap rated for 30,000lbs. Do your research and build your DREAM!!!


Oooops, you reminded me: I left off my list our CHP (California Highway Patrol) approved hardened steel tow chain that we also carry along. I bought this chain after breaking our previous 30,000 lb. pull tow strap trying to yank our traveling companion's 24 ft. Class C out of a super-soft-shoulder stuck situation. I had to try because we couldn't get cell service out there in the boondocks north of Death Valley.

I guess that our E450 V10 chassis can - with it's 4:56 rear differential and a lot of motorhome weight on it's rear duals on a hard and dry surface - exert an awful lot of horizontal pull force!


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

pnichols

The Other California

Senior Member

Joined: 04/26/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 12/05/21 05:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

AdvancedQs wrote:

Wow again!!!

Exactly what I’m looking to do.


Believe it or not, my truck camper dimensions are as large! More height and only 3” less width than your class C.

I found the “roads” in the Colorado rocky disbursed camping areas were barely passable. I had to carefully plan where to put my tires to keep the truck off the ground and off rocks. I did not, however, find I needed 4 wheel drive. It wasn’t slippery, it was huge gullies, ravines and holes in the road.

By the same token, I saw more than one standard, stock class C go blasting very deep into the camping in Divide, CO that I wouldn’t do with the truck camper out of fear of the load shifting. The hills were crazy and they drove right up/down.

I also feel like if you ever did get stuck with 2wd, winches are probably all you need. I could be wrong and I’m sure it’s a hot topic, but seems 2wd and winches would work great.

Your setup sounds ideal.

I want to carry a small enduro motorcycle to go into town with and get parts if needed. I carry that now, actually. But the garnish in reach is a good idea. Been meaning to get one. Good for medical emergencies especially.

Thanks for this post. Very encouraging.




pnichols wrote:

We take our 24 ft. Itasca non-slide Class C slowly and carefully offroad at times.

- We bought it new and it was based on the E450 chassis instead of the E350 chassis that is most often used for small Class C motorhomes. We wanted the overkill ruggedness, reliability, inexpensive/convenient repair/maintenance, extra weight carrying margin, and solid handling of an underloaded Ford E450 chassis supporting the coach.

- I have stock E450 rims on it, but larger diameter tires on those rims in order to provide more ground clearance.

- The fully mounted spare tire is carried in the rear up between the frame members just like on pickup trucks (for a lower center of gravity and elimination of an up-high bouncing spare ... as when carried on/above the rear bumper), and I carry a 12 ton double extension (for higher lift) hydraulic jack for emergency changing of a tire anywhere on soft/unstable ground.

- We carry five 3-step homemade leveling blocks (plus additional wood pieces) along for leveling flexibility on sloped camping spots and for possible help in getting tires unstuck in soft spots. Wooden leveling blocks aren't as likely to break/split as much on rough/rocky surfaces as composite blocks.

- We did not want any slides so as to provide for maximum shear strength in the walls, more reliability protection from a slide that won't close, less overall weight, less chance of leaks in heavy rains when camped or traveling, help in keeping the overall center of gravity low, and for elimination of any stress damage from slides jiggling slightly when traveling.

- All kinds of tools and spare parts stay in the motorhome at all times so they're always there without having to load them special whenever we go on trips. These include such things as: A full size shovel, a pickaxe, a spare serpentine belt plus a special tool to help mount it, a crowbar, extra engine fluids, a tire puncture repair kit, tire inflation canisters, a full power compressor, Eternabond tape, a caulking gun and tubes of caulking, a remote inspection scope to look at plumbing and wiring in behind cabinets, spare plumbing piping and fixtures, spare bulbs, 12V and 120V extension cords, a high power 12V portable fan, a hand saw for large limbs, an axe, all kinds of flashlights, and the coach came with a built-in exterior roof access ladder to inspect for/repair any roof damage while on trips.

- In addition to the built-in 4000 watt generator powered from the main 55 gallon gas tank and the built-in coach battery charger, we also carry along a portable generator and a portable battery charger. We can charge and keep charged our coach and engine batteries five different non-solar ways.

- And last but by no means least: We carry along a Garmin Mini satellite rescue and text communication device (along with emergency rescue insurance) ... since many times we can be out of range of mobile phone cellular towers.

Our main offroad concerns are - no 4X4, and the width and the height of the coach structure at 101 inches wide and 11'6" tall. But what this non-slide size and non-4X4 package gives us is all the comforts of home way out in many U.S. boondock areas and at purchase and maintenance pricing that we can afford.

So far our most remote trip has been into the Oregon Outback 25 miles each way, during which we had to travel at around 7-10 MPH to keep the motorhome under control and free from damage.


For what it's worth, you might want to carry your enduro motorcycle on a rack mounted on the front of a Class C. Bouncing weight hanging off the rear is not always a good idea if you can avoid it.

valhalla360

No paticular place.

Senior Member

Joined: 08/19/2009

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 12/05/21 10:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just buy a small older class C, so it won't feel so bad when you beat the tar out of it. I've seen them in some surprising areas. Keep the rear overhang short.

The weight distribution on a class C should help with getting enough traction. If it doesn't have it a limited slip diff would be helpful.


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2021 Gray Wolf
Gemini Catamaran 34'
Full Time spliting time between boat and RV


AdvancedQs

Tampa

Full Member

Joined: 08/09/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/06/21 02:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:



For what it's worth, you might want to carry your enduro motorcycle on a rack mounted on the front of a Class C. Bouncing weight hanging off the rear is not always a good idea if you can avoid it.


That’s a no-go. I just toured the country with it on the front of the truck camper. I took heavy damage to the bike from road rocks. Windshield took some damage too. The rocks put a small crack in the gauges. They got water in them and shorted out the bike’s electrical system, leaving it inoperative. It also contributed to some overheating of the RV by blocking the airflow to the radiator at speed in 100+ temps going up mountains.

The weight in the rear isn’t ideal, but it’s much better for the bike and keeping the RV cool.

AdvancedQs

Tampa

Full Member

Joined: 08/09/2021

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/06/21 02:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

Just buy a small older class C, so it won't feel so bad when you beat the tar out of it. I've seen them in some surprising areas. Keep the rear overhang short.

The weight distribution on a class C should help with getting enough traction. If it doesn't have it a limited slip diff would be helpful.


Not a bad idea, really. Could still put a winch on it and whatever.

The reason I didn’t go Isuzu/Fuso with travel trailer box is they are no good on the highway according to the internet. Lots and lots of mechanical problems with those trucks if you do highway driving. They are designed for in-town use in urban areas, mostly and wind out at high RPMs struggling to reach 70mph on the highway. I had tried to find a suitable cab/chassis replacement that could fit a 25ft box for similar money but could not.

I also had some thinking time about gas vs diesel and decided I don’t care which. I’ve had some awful problems with automatic transmissions over the years, so I hope to get an Allisin or something good like that. I wish I could keep my current manual transmission. That will be the bad part of changing RVs. Losing the reliability of my manual transmission.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/06/21 08:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

AdvancedQs wrote:

pnichols wrote:



For what it's worth, you might want to carry your enduro motorcycle on a rack mounted on the front of a Class C. Bouncing weight hanging off the rear is not always a good idea if you can avoid it.


That’s a no-go. I just toured the country with it on the front of the truck camper. I took heavy damage to the bike from road rocks. Windshield took some damage too. The rocks put a small crack in the gauges. They got water in them and shorted out the bike’s electrical system, leaving it inoperative. It also contributed to some overheating of the RV by blocking the airflow to the radiator at speed in 100+ temps going up mountains.

The weight in the rear isn’t ideal, but it’s much better for the bike and keeping the RV cool.

^ Very good points, and while the back end/hitches on class C's in general aren't known for their strength, generally and log rear overhang is far less than ideal for a place to carry significant weight, the motorcycle on the front idea has very limited applicability, IMO. Mostly for the reasons mentioned.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Prev

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > Is there a Class C that can be driven into sketchy terrain?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2022 CWI, Inc. © 2022 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.