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BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Joined: 02/15/2006

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Posted: 01/01/22 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bob and Don must be the last ones still living on the Plains (spelt wrong of course--flat places are planes)

Everyone else ( wimps like me for sure) has moved here to the Island it seems. Getting crowded! It is still tough though--last week it stayed just below freezing and you have to keep rotating the hummingbird feeder when it freezes. They are managing somehow.

Next week we should be back to normal and see some new flowers and be able to go RVing again up-Island [emoticon]


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StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 01/01/22 09:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NRALIFR wrote:

Don’t Renogy and Relion (and probably others) make self heating Li batteries?

I realize that’s going to either use some energy from the battery itself, or from the charger, but the technology to use Li’s in extreme cold exists.

Do all the EV’s sold in the Great White North come with SiO2 battery packs?

[emoticon][emoticon]


no,SIO2 is a very nich market and in reality more suited for back up batteries in remote pumphouses where if they go dead becasue the charger quit working they can charge them up and hope there not dead because this has happened to many times. a normal lead acid would need to be replaced every time. to show how nich they are I think in westren canada there is only one physical dealer that carries them. I may be right but every time I look asmuth solar is the only place that comes up, hence why Painotuna needs to come to BC to buy his batteries.


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StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 01/01/22 09:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jaycocreek wrote:

Quote:

I know people that live in rv's all year round in alberta. -45 and there warm as a bug but they have the big 200 gal propain tanks and they put bales around the outside with heating lamps under the unit and so on.


In an RV park with hookups is one thing,on a job site without power is another..I have had several vynal skirts made for my RV's and done the hay just once because of mice..insulation board then the V-skirting with lights under specific places..That's the way I lived for years when not on the site..Oh and hair dryer in hand..lol...

The older RV's were easier to keep from freezing them the new ones..Water lines in the open inside that really only froze by the doors which could be fixed...

Boondocking without power in an rv sure is a learning experience especially below zero and why we went wood heat and winterized on site in the boonies..


ya, we used to go skidooing in the mountians in the winter and take units that definatly were not 4 season or even 3 season for that matter haha... would be -35 and we would keep it warm but we had the furnace cranked, the clay pots on the stove and a ton of blankets, outside we had the big bonfire going till you had enough antifreeze in your system to help you sleep. things I would never do now, but we used to have fun. I have a couple friends that bought thoes little wood stoves that are made for sailboats and such and mounted them in the camper. kinda neat but now your packing wood also, with the camper i have little enough space as it is, and the 5th wheel is good to -21c and I have tested it at -18C and I was comfy with no excessive propane use so im good with that.

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 01/01/22 09:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

StirCrazy wrote:

I'll rephrase that and add in "most of canada". growing up in alberta it wasnt uncommon to go out on the snowmobilds at -40 and -35 cold snaps in alberta sask and manatoba are just the normal. heck it was tickling -35 at work in BC this last week. I understand his delema as he uses his rv for a travling hotel for his work, but his insistance that LI won't work is the issue.

they won't work because he doesnt want them to, is more the answer. with the small size capability he could easily build his own for far cheeper than the SIO2 end up with 3 times the capacity in the summer and about 6 times the capacity at -40.

because of the smaller form factor he could put ridgid foam lining the whole battery tray and put a few 12V heating pads on them. so before he leaves home the batteries would be warm and then driving the coach stays warm, not going to tell me he doesnt use a block heater at thoes temps or the old coach would never start.

if this coach is so highly modified, why is he afraid to do another for the purpose of giving him the most available power possible... we'll never know


I agree with the 2nd part...he simply doesn't want them to work...for whatever reason, we probably will never know.

But the vast majority of Canada's population lives in areas no colder than Michigan and the Canadians we know largely put them away come winter. Not saying it can't be done but it's really unusual to be out boondocking in those temps...even if snowmobiling, most people are typically connecting to grid power, so a big battery bank is not critical.


your talking about one or two geographical areas which is why there is a higher concentration of people there, but drive through toronto, vancouver and thoes types of places and how many rv's do you see in the yards, not many compared to other areas. the largest geographical area of canad will very often see -30 or -35 in the winter.. I live in one of the anomoly areas, a semi arid area in the southren interior that is in the summer the hottest city in canada and normaly our winter hi is about 0C or 32F. drive 15 minuits from me and the temp drops 10 to 15 degrees C, 1 hour north and I can be at -25 and colder as you go farther north. we usaly have a 1-2 week cold snap where its about 10 degrees colder. this week is the first ime I have ever seen it at -27 here and where I work, one hour away it was -36. move to alberta, sask, manatoba, most of ontario top half of quebec and so of lab they will all see temps that cold and thats pretty much every section of canada, you go north and thats spring weather haha.. just because people huddle togeather in tiny places paying crazy prices just to escape the normal canadian temps, doen't mean that it chages just because 1/3 to 1/2 the population don't experence it.

so yes there is a need to camp in the cold for the other half of the population, is there a need to camp in -40... no but some may work in that and use a rv for work. My dad worked in fort mcmurry for years and lived in his 5th wheel while he was up there. if there is a will there is a way. but the more likly senario is -10 ish in BC for hunting season in the interior or a little colder in alberta and sask.

Steve

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 01/01/22 09:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BFL13 wrote:

Bob and Don must be the last ones still living on the Plains (spelt wrong of course--flat places are planes)

Everyone else ( wimps like me for sure) has moved here to the Island it seems. Getting crowded! It is still tough though--last week it stayed just below freezing and you have to keep rotating the hummingbird feeder when it freezes. They are managing somehow.

Next week we should be back to normal and see some new flowers and be able to go RVing again up-Island [emoticon]


I went from edmonton, to the island for 20 years and settles in Kamloops. I never could get used to the dreary overcast drizzly depressing days in the winter there. so I gave that up and cancled my plans to move back to the deep frees caled alberta and settled for whet I think is a nice compromize. sunny, hot as He!! in the sumer, almost no rain all year, mild in the winter (only 8 degrees colder than victoria on average but with out the humidity) and to tell you the truth, I shoveled more snow in langford than I have here, except for a couple weird years haha..

you didn't wrap christmas lights around the feeder like I have seen a bunch doing?

RetiredRealtorRick

St. Augustine Beach, FL

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Posted: 01/01/22 11:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

I guess to each his own, but nobody will ever convince me that such frigid cold temperatures are harmless.
I spent February in Fairbanks AK in the 1980s. As a jogger I found I could only do that at 0° with a face covering. At temperatures below that it was impossible as I could feel my throat start to burn.


My point exactly. Some people love a 'challenge' -- so do I -- but when it adversely affects my health, and I have other options, why would I subject myself to it? [emoticon]


. . . never confuse education with intelligence, nor motion with progress

BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 01/01/22 05:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

deleted--drat the paywall link!

PerryB67

Lanesboro, Minnesota

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Posted: 01/01/22 05:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

I guess to each his own, but nobody will ever convince me that such frigid cold temperatures are harmless.
Florida? Mold, mildew, oppressive humidity, hurricanes, murders, are some of Florida's noted characteristics. The average lifespan in Florida is 78.9 years. The average lifespan in British Columbia is 82.1 years or Ontario at 82.4 years, eh.

Enjoy,

Perry
Minnesota

* This post was edited 01/02/22 06:36am by PerryB67 *


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st clair

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Posted: 01/01/22 06:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

8 pages of replies... I gotta get in on this party. wahooo.
Here is my opinion....

StirCrazy

Kamloops, BC, Canada

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Posted: 01/01/22 06:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PerryB67 wrote:

RetiredRealtorRick wrote:

I guess to each his own, but nobody will ever convince me that such frigid cold temperatures are harmless.
Florida? Mold, mildew, oppressive humidity, hurricanes, murders, are some of Florida's noted characteristics. The average age in Florida is 78.9 years. The average age in British Columbia is 82.1 years or Ontario at 82.4 years, eh.

Enjoy,

Perry
Minnesota


because around 50% of people from BC live in vancouver or victoruia where any temp below 36 degrees is a rarity. so they don't have the stifiling heat of florida or the cold of anywhere else in canada. summers are mild so less skin cancer and so on..

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