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2oldman

Nevada

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Posted: 01/10/22 08:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:

The typical heated mattress pad is going to use about 80-120 AH per night.
My pad uses nowhere near that much power, and it doesn't need a large inverter, but it does need an inverter. It's not a high-wattage appliance. For those who have an inverter, it's a good option.

markchengr

Seattle

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Posted: 01/10/22 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

X2 on heated mattress pad. We use it to preheat the bed before we get in. If boondocking, running on battery, we use an inverter to preheat for about 15 minutes.

opnspaces

San Diego Ca

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Posted: 01/10/22 09:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ticki2 wrote:

I think you will find that the foil face insulation directly under the mattress will still condensate , the moisture comes from you body . Better to put the insulation directly on the cab over floor and then the latttice on the insulation for circulation , then the mattress .


Thanks for posting. I do agree with Ticki2 about the condensation but with a twist. I would probably skip the lattice and instead substitute the lattice with three or four pieces of 1 x 2 that run front to back. Then I would sleep with no wood and in the morning lift the mattress and slide the pieces of wood in to vent any moisture all day. Run a long strip of duct tape the entire length of the boards so that there are no splinters or roughness to snag on the bottom of the mattress.

Actually the more I think about it the more I wonder if that clammy feeling is an actual problem. I mean what's the difference between the mattress on the wood deck as it was from the factory vs. the mattress on the foam? I guess the wood might absorb some moisture. But that seems minimal at best. Just some thoughts that might work better as opposed to the loss of headroom in the top bunk from the wood being there all night.


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JimK-NY

NY

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Posted: 01/10/22 10:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It seems hard to believe but the area under my mattress was just a raw piece of plywood. I sealed that with a couple of coats of enamel paint so no moisture soaks into the wood. For normal Summer use, I occasionally check but there is never any moisture under the mattress. When the outside temps are cold, around 40 degrees or below, I need to raise up the mattress with a foot stool and then use my 12 volt fan to dry the area. I do that once or twice a week before any serious dampness accumulates.

There are pads that can be used to keep the area dry but I don't want any increase in thickness because the ceiling space over the bed is already minimal.

Lwiddis

Near Bishop, California

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Posted: 01/10/22 10:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I cover the floor with washable throw rugs. Helps a bunch.


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Bedlam

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Posted: 01/10/22 11:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

With double pane windows, I found the most heat leaks from the poorly insulated entry door with single pane window. We do get a little bit of heat loss through the bottom of the side outs, but this is not an issue in the that S&S.

I have foil wrapped bubbles under the mattress and memory foam with quilted top above the mattress with flannel sheets and down comforter, so I do not see much heat loss through the bottom of the cab over. The sides of the cab over do sweat if I keep the closet doors closed - Enough breath gets inside to hit the cold outer wall. Leaving the doors open at night heat up the inside walls enough to not cause this. The front wall and ceiling never had condensation issues but are exposed to more heat. I have not tried insulating the inside of the closet more but wonder if closed cell foam would not be a better choice than foil backed air bubbles.


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n0arp

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Posted: 01/10/22 03:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We found a memory foam mattress provides much better insulation than innerspring. Any garden variety queen fits in our AF1140. We stayed in single digit temps several times last year and never felt that our bed itself was cold. The floor, on the other hand, can get a bit chilly but rugs help to manage that - anti-fatigue mats are great to walk on and provide decent insulation. Like Bedlam, I found that the single pane glass in our entry door is the worst offender and we keep it covered with a thick vinyl snap-on cover that came with the camper, which seems to help. We've never had major condensation issues and check under the bed every sheet change for mold and moisture, but never found any.

We're in our fifth wheel now, and recently started using the Eight Sleep Pod Pro mattress cover. We might take it with us when we swap back into the TC. We track all energy usage as we're mostly off-grid, and it uses (AC, not DC) 0.5-2kWh per night depending on ambient conditions and settings. Our overall monthly average so far in January has been 0.998kWh/24hr. For December, slightly more at 1.054kW/24h. Since we're just heating the bed, we need no supplemental heat except to keep things from freezing, so have the propane furnace thermostat on one of the lowest settings. I realize most RV owners (TC especially) don't have large enough systems for this to be a viable option, but I've found it to be one of the most efficient uses of our energy - both for heating, and cooling - where it uses about the same figures as posted above.

* This post was edited 01/10/22 04:13pm by n0arp *

Reality Check

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Posted: 01/10/22 04:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting thread.

We camp alot in the winter. Just spent 4 days in 0-5F degree weather. Never really had an issue with the mattress or cold. Condensation, can be an issue, but it's a super easy solution. Got to have air movement. I usually just crack the kitchen window a bit and open the bathroom vent slightly (fan stays off). An example, two days into the camp, no condensation at all, windows being the best indicator. Cooked breakfast for three extra adults and two kids (squeeze them in..!) and after a bit over two hours, the windows were covered in condensation. It's our breath. Turned the fan on when they left and half hour later, camper was cleared up.

A suggestion for under the mattress. One needs air movement but most can't afford the height loss. Pick up a piece of Miradrain or equivalent. It's a composite drain product, and it will keep an open airway under the mattress. About 1/2" tall, plastic and fiber, water proof.

[image]

Last... skip the flannel sheets. They're only warm 'after' you get in and warm them up. Go fleece. Tell them I sent you...! There is no comparison.


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dieseltruckdriver

Black Hills of SD

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Posted: 01/10/22 06:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

Heated mattress pad.
This.
I tested our heated mattress pad and found it used half the power of our electric blanket. I don't remember the numbers anymore, but that and the foam pads that someone posted between the mattress and plywood let us go below zero F in our S&S.


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Camper_Jeff_&_Kelli

Seattle

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Posted: 01/10/22 09:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reality Check wrote:

Interesting thread.

We camp alot in the winter. Just spent 4 days in 0-5F degree weather. Never really had an issue with the mattress or cold. Condensation, can be an issue, but it's a super easy solution. Got to have air movement. I usually just crack the kitchen window a bit and open the bathroom vent slightly (fan stays off). An example, two days into the camp, no condensation at all, windows being the best indicator. Cooked breakfast for three extra adults and two kids (squeeze them in..!) and after a bit over two hours, the windows were covered in condensation. It's our breath. Turned the fan on when they left and half hour later, camper was cleared up.

A suggestion for under the mattress. One needs air movement but most can't afford the height loss. Pick up a piece of Miradrain or equivalent. It's a composite drain product, and it will keep an open airway under the mattress. About 1/2" tall, plastic and fiber, water proof.

[image]

Last... skip the flannel sheets. They're only warm 'after' you get in and warm them up. Go fleece. Tell them I sent you...! There is no comparison.


The foundation dimpled sheet would work very well. I actually have a roll of it in my shop.
I talked with Joe Chi Ochi, Matt, who foil tape sealed a foam board down in his cabover and wrote a post about it back about 2007 with good results. I'll keep an eye on the current setup to see how it performs. Rather than the foil tape, there is a PVC tape which is stronger and more flexible than the aluminum tape. I'll keep you posted on results.


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