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JRscooby

Indepmo

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Posted: 03/12/22 05:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dedmiston wrote:

larry cad wrote:

dedmiston wrote:

A fridge needs a power source. An RV fridge can run on electric or LP. The residential fridge only runs on electricity.

Unless you have a really long extension cord, you need a power source on the road and when you’re camped. Even if you have hookups at night, you still need power in the road:

- Lots of DC power in your batteries
- An inverter to run the fridge on AC
- Solar panels to recharge the batteries while you drive

It’s all possible, but not cheap.

We have 700w of solar, a nice big inverter, and four 6v batteries. This works well for us when we boondock, but I wouldn’t want to run a residential fridge all day when we need the juice at night.

We’ve been dry camping most of this week and I’ve only run the generator about 45 minutes so far to power my wife’s tea kettle, her hair dryer, and my coffee pot sometimes. This would be totally different if we were powering a fridge too.


To the OP, this post is full of errors and misleading advice. If I were you, I would ignore it and continue on your quest for correct technical information.


Got specifics?

Or got a mini-nuke plant in your RV for power? Or a long extension cord for the fridge?



I would question your definition of "a lot of power". My absorption fridge works just fine on the excess power generated by the alternator. Compressor fridge is known to use less power.

Gonzo42

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Posted: 03/12/22 06:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you can afford it, spring for a unit that will power by 12 VDC, 120 VAC, and propane. We have one that runs on 120 VAC or propane and switches automatically.


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dedmiston

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Posted: 03/12/22 07:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

I would question your definition of "a lot of power". My absorption fridge works just fine on the excess power generated by the alternator. Compressor fridge is known to use less power.


I’m thinking of the dozens of threads I’ve seen here from people frustrated about the fact that their residential fridge drains their batteries during the day (if, and that’s a big if, they even have an inverter and can run it while they drive) and they wish their dealer had explained to them that they don’t have enough power to drive from Point A to Point B and that they can’t boondock without running their gen all night. It’s enough firsthand accounts of frustration to indicate that the residential fridges draw more power than most people are equipped with, at least not until they invest in a lot of upgrades.


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valhalla360

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Posted: 03/12/22 08:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dedmiston is pretty much correct, though you could argue some of the semantics.

A traditional RV absorption fridge is still a great option for boondocking. It's needs a tiny amount of 12v DC power to run the control board and a tank of propane is good for weeks of operation. Downside is they are slow to cool the interior. If you are on shore power, there is an electric heating element that replaces the heat from the propane flame. Some even have a 12v heating element but that's pretty inefficient.

Then you have 12v DC fridges. These can run directly off battery power and because they were designed for low power consumption are probably the best option for running off electricity without shorepower. They still use far more power than the control board on an absorption fridge but a decent battery bank and/or connection via the umbilical cable to the trucks alternator output is typically plenty to keep then going. If you want to spend multiple days off grid, you will need a means of generating power before your battery bank dies (most commonly solar or generator) but no need for an inverter.

Then you have residential 120v AC fridges. Newer ones are generally not quite as good as 12v fridges in terms of efficiency but not horrible. A downside is you need an inverter to convert the 12v DC to 120v AC. That adds, cost, complication and you will likely lose some power to the conversion.

If you are always on shore power when parked, a residential fridge is a fine option. They will hold cold during driving days just fine.
If you will boondock a lot, absorption is still the ideal but if you put in a good solar system with an upsized battery bank, 12v is very much viable.

Many newer RV's (even entry level) are switching to 12v.


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jdc1

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Posted: 03/12/22 09:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Start here

https://camperfront.com/how-long-will-an-rv-residential-fridge-run-on-battery/

wowens79

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Posted: 03/12/22 10:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I’ve got a Resi fridge with 2 GC2 batteries, and an inverter.
I go to the storage place, turn on the inverter, hookup and drive the 15-20 to the house, and you can tell it is cooling at that point. Then add the cold stuff from the home fridge, and all is good. It cools down really quickly.
I’ve driven 10 hours with the inverter running, and it still had power. My next rv, I’ll make sure it has a resi fridge also.
I do live in the southeast, so there is not really any boondocking.


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afidel

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Posted: 03/13/22 03:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

Dedmiston is pretty much correct, though you could argue some of the semantics.

A traditional RV absorption fridge is still a great option for boondocking. It's needs a tiny amount of 12v DC power to run the control board and a tank of propane is good for weeks of operation. Downside is they are slow to cool the interior. If you are on shore power, there is an electric heating element that replaces the heat from the propane flame. Some even have a 12v heating element but that's pretty inefficient.

Then you have 12v DC fridges. These can run directly off battery power and because they were designed for low power consumption are probably the best option for running off electricity without shorepower. They still use far more power than the control board on an absorption fridge but a decent battery bank and/or connection via the umbilical cable to the trucks alternator output is typically plenty to keep then going. If you want to spend multiple days off grid, you will need a means of generating power before your battery bank dies (most commonly solar or generator) but no need for an inverter.

Then you have residential 120v AC fridges. Newer ones are generally not quite as good as 12v fridges in terms of efficiency but not horrible. A downside is you need an inverter to convert the 12v DC to 120v AC. That adds, cost, complication and you will likely lose some power to the conversion.

If you are always on shore power when parked, a residential fridge is a fine option. They will hold cold during driving days just fine.
If you will boondock a lot, absorption is still the ideal but if you put in a good solar system with an upsized battery bank, 12v is very much viable.

Many newer RV's (even entry level) are switching to 12v.


The much bigger deal than the inefficiency it's that the inverter draws a load 24x7 which eats quite a few watt-hours. For inverters rated at say 2kw this actually ends up eating more Wh than their inefficiency. What some folks do is have a relatively small inverter that is just big enough to handle the motor surge of the fridge and then have a second inverter for running loads like the microwave or coffee pot which they can turn off when not in use.


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wa8yxm

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Posted: 03/13/22 08:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

machunt wrote:

If one was to replace the fridge in there current rv with a residential fridge, what would have to be done to be able to cool it down before leaving on a trip? Generator, inverter?

Inverter will drain your batteries
Shore power or generator would be my first/second choice

NOTE: They cool fairly quickly so load Turn and go. RV fridges take much longer to pre-cool but a residential will cool fairly fast.

Consider this: both Dometic and NoCold at one time made what I call "Danfoss" class all electric 12/120 volt Fridges.. They need a bit of pre-cooling as well as the Gas/Electric types do. but.. they draw 30=50 Watts door closed. Seems strange to have to say Door closed because the interior light on a residential type does not draw enough power to make a significant difference.
But 20 watts (about an inside light) is a major amount when the cooling unit only draws 40 watts. Consider one of these high effienc y all Electric units if you can. they are expensive. but these days so are residential.

I have a small chest freezer (my 2nd) of this class

Danfoss is ONE of the companies that makes the compressors.. I use their name to id the class cause it's the only one I remember.

Here is an example of what I am typing about:
https://www.westmarine.com/buy/norcold--de-0061-ac-dc-refrigerator-freezer--5388699?gclid=Cj0KCQiAybaRBhDtARIsAIEG3knzREuy-3u8LVSLraERvfUSRLEcaotSxPHeUL5cqSWZ2ew23YWDrCEaAlUwEALw_wcB


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dieseltruckdriver

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Posted: 03/13/22 09:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was going to mention that the easier choice really should be a 12 volt compressor fridge also.

I noticed going to a couple small rv shows that there were very few residential fridges offered this year, there were almost all 12 volt compressor fridges. I chatted with a factory rep about that and he said they are much easier to install, do a better job cooling, and give more fridge space than the same size cutout absorption fridge.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 03/13/22 11:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

machunt wrote:

i agree ,,,maybe i wasnt clear. plugging in at home is not a option. never mind why. I know i could buy a genny and plug it in at the storage lot. but my concern is while traveling what can i do to keep fridge cold?

Have a c rap load of power reserve and a decent inverter, or realize the clear benefits of a RV fridge that can run off of 2 or 3 power sources. Hard to beat LP regardless of some folks apparent distaste for it.


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