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 > are there upsides/downfalls to single-axle TT's?

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profdant139

Southern California

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Posted: 03/23/22 10:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've had single axle trailers for 16 years because I want a really small trailer. It fits on my driveway and fits into tight spaces generally.

But I think a double axle would be safer. Life is a series of compromises.


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theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 03/23/22 10:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Most single axle trailers are shorter which makes the following problem worse. On rough roads the trailer tongue will try to lift the rear of the tow vehicle or push it down.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 03/23/22 10:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jdc1 wrote:

It all sounds lie a huge waste of money to me. Selling your house will cost you big $$$$. Selling the trailer to buy a smaller one? Big waste of $$$ too. Keep everything you have. Grandkids need room. You do plan to take your grandkids with you, don't you?


Lol…another “expert” opinion that has nothing to do with the question!


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Grit dog

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Posted: 03/23/22 10:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP, aside from a very few trailers, that maybe can be had, same size, in a single or tandem configuration, the biggest difference is bigger trailers take 2 axles and small ones generally have 1 axle. Pick the size you want and that will decide how many tires it has.

Boomerweps

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Posted: 03/23/22 10:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While looking at single axle trailers, look for the packages with the upgraded axle. For example Forest River Wolf Pup series normally comes with a limiting 3500# axle and 14” wheels but they have an Adventure package that upgrades the axle to 5000# and 15” wheels.

IMHO, overall advantages lean to the dual axle units. Single axles are a lighter tow and easier to maintain.

I can see the appeal of going to a smaller TT. IMO, unused bunks waste overall space and make for odd stowage areas. We bought ours, like many, thinking about the grandkids. Mistake on our part. I removed the upper bunk, added a clothes rod in that upper space. When my granddaughter camped with us, I slept in the remaining bunk. If my grandson camps with us, he’ll get the bunk. They almost only ever camped together with us when we camped in the same campground with our daughter & SIL, pretty much babysitting duty ;(

BUT, if it’s paid for?


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Bob/Olallawa

Mason Co, WA/Bullhead City AZ

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Posted: 03/23/22 12:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Other than room to roam inside the trailer and storage the single axle wins. Being able to get into smaller sites is a big plus. Backing them up is not much different than the larger tandem rigs once you practice a bit. you will have many more sites available to use because the larger rigs won't fit or have room to maneuver the things into the site. tire problems and results happen on either single or tandem. Have never had a single axle try to overturn because of a flat or blowout. If the right floor plan and size for your needs comes in a single axle why not buy it.


Welcome to my home, that door you just broke down was there for your protection not mine.

propchef

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Posted: 03/23/22 12:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:


IMHO, if a blowout on trailer causes you to loose control or roll your rig you didn't have control before the blowout. (Fact is the rear axle of TV is where a blowout is most likely to cause loss of control) Just trumping here, but I think there is a better chance with single axle that the driver would notice a issue with all the tires on one side, pull over and stop before the tire beats the snot out of trailer.
Single axle takes less power to turn, because don't need to force axles out of line or slip tires sideways. If fenders are inside body, tandem will use more space.
.


I would think the use of a TPMS would eliminate this worry.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 03/23/22 01:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

propchef wrote:

JRscooby wrote:


IMHO, if a blowout on trailer causes you to loose control or roll your rig you didn't have control before the blowout. (Fact is the rear axle of TV is where a blowout is most likely to cause loss of control) Just trumping here, but I think there is a better chance with single axle that the driver would notice a issue with all the tires on one side, pull over and stop before the tire beats the snot out of trailer.
Single axle takes less power to turn, because don't need to force axles out of line or slip tires sideways. If fenders are inside body, tandem will use more space.
.


I would think the use of a TPMS would eliminate this worry.


"Blowouts" are a sudden loss of pressure event which will depressurize the tire so fast the TPMS will never register it fast enough to make any difference what so ever.

A single axle trailer, you will notice a change in handling pretty quick since there is no other tire on the side to hide the flat.

People live and die that "Technology" will save them, this is a case of TPMS will alarm well after the fact and during the time you are fighting the trailer to a safe stop so you will be well aware of the flat.

TPMS might make some difference on dual axle trailers, since you have two tires on each side you may not notice much change in handling..

But in reality no one should ever rely on TPMS to tell the hole story, it is not a substitute for physical inspections, should always check your tire pressures daily and verify that the tires do not have any physical changes or damages whenever you get out of the vehicle for rest stops..

I always do a quick walk around my trailer and vehicle to verify both do not have any noticeable physical damage to the tires. I make sure they appear to have "normal" aired up look meaning that they look like they have plenty of air pressure every time we fuel up, or stop for rests or food.

propchef

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Posted: 03/23/22 04:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

propchef wrote:

JRscooby wrote:


IMHO, if a blowout on trailer causes you to loose control or roll your rig you didn't have control before the blowout. (Fact is the rear axle of TV is where a blowout is most likely to cause loss of control) Just trumping here, but I think there is a better chance with single axle that the driver would notice a issue with all the tires on one side, pull over and stop before the tire beats the snot out of trailer.
Single axle takes less power to turn, because don't need to force axles out of line or slip tires sideways. If fenders are inside body, tandem will use more space.
.


I would think the use of a TPMS would eliminate this worry.


"Blowouts" are a sudden loss of pressure event which will depressurize the tire so fast the TPMS will never register it fast enough to make any difference what so ever.

A single axle trailer, you will notice a change in handling pretty quick since there is no other tire on the side to hide the flat.

People live and die that "Technology" will save them, this is a case of TPMS will alarm well after the fact and during the time you are fighting the trailer to a safe stop so you will be well aware of the flat.

TPMS might make some difference on dual axle trailers, since you have two tires on each side you may not notice much change in handling..

But in reality no one should ever rely on TPMS to tell the hole story, it is not a substitute for physical inspections, should always check your tire pressures daily and verify that the tires do not have any physical changes or damages whenever you get out of the vehicle for rest stops..

I always do a quick walk around my trailer and vehicle to verify both do not have any noticeable physical damage to the tires. I make sure they appear to have "normal" aired up look meaning that they look like they have plenty of air pressure every time we fuel up, or stop for rests or food.


I was responding to a post that was describing losing one tire and not noticing, causing further damage to the trailer. The TPMS will tell you immediately, checking visually before you leave will not.

I never suggested one should rely on it to tell the hole (sic) story.

lane hog

Tucson, AZ & NW Chicago Burbs, IL

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Posted: 03/23/22 04:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Smallest trailer we've owned was 23' and I don't know if I could ever go smaller, especially with dogs now that the kids are all adults. And yes, you'll still need room for those adult kids from time to time.

trailernovice wrote:

That could be important....When I had a blowout on a tandem-axle trailer on I-10 in the Arizona desert, I didn't realize it until the tire was shredded (trailer feeling strange, and people passing me pointed)....drove on the shredded tire long enough to ruin the wheel and, more importantly, it tore the bathroom floor and ripped the water intake line...had to get a slapdash repair in Las Vegas to be able to continue the trip


Chances are that the damage to the floor and water line happened immediately, especially if it was a tread separation like we had. Punched a football size hole in the floor, and also took our our water pump.



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