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 > Butt splice connector to join 10 gauge to 12 gauge wire?

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Mike134

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Posted: 03/26/22 05:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jdc1 wrote:

Do it right....solder them together, then use the heat shrink.


Solder is good but a good crimp is just as reliable. How can I say for certain? I have yet to see a building I wired the past 40 years using crimps burn down.


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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 03/26/22 05:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

High or low voltage???


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Posted: 03/26/22 06:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Let's clear this up
GDtrailer pointed to a non-insulated crimp tool. That tool is for non-insulated crimp connectors only, such as These. I prefer this type. A quality tool will provide a very reliable crimp. Then goop it with any of the numerous sealants or RTVs available and heat shrink over it to ooz out the sealant for a good seal.

Then there are the Insulated Butt Splices. These use a different type of crimp tool. Notice how the tool jaw in the picture is different. You must use this type of crimp tool for any type of insulated crimp connector.


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Vintage465

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Posted: 03/26/22 07:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was pretty into soldering but splices until I came across the crimp butt splices that have the heat shrink integrated into the butt splice. I think this nearly rules out any type of failure assuming your eyes are actually open when installing them.


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LittleBill

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Posted: 03/26/22 09:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

the type that don't need a crimp, are these, they have the solder built into them. I have a set for emergency repair. they work well.

Solder/HeatShrink without a Soldering gun





Gdetrailer

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Posted: 03/26/22 09:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2112 wrote:

Let's clear this up
GDtrailer pointed to a non-insulated crimp tool. That tool is for non-insulated crimp connectors only, such as These. I prefer this type. A quality tool will provide a very reliable crimp. Then goop it with any of the numerous sealants or RTVs available and heat shrink over it to ooz out the sealant for a good seal.

Then there are the Insulated Butt Splices. These use a different type of crimp tool. Notice how the tool jaw in the picture is different. You must use this type of crimp tool for any type of insulated crimp connector.


Buy poor quality crimps like what you linked and you get poor quality covers..

You CAN use the crimper I linked for insulated butt connectors and it works much better with much more reliable connections than the tool associated with with your link. Cheapo crimp connections tend to have a harder plastic cover, better connections have a better cover which is more flexible.

Crimpers like this..

[image]

Crushes the connection into a oval, results in not much better than a pair of pliers.

The ones I linked has a pin in the center which pushes the center of the crimp down and in towards the wire making for a vastly superior termination.

I have for 30+ yrs used the style of crimper I limked on insulated and non insulated crimps with 100% success rate.. The other style, yeah I have one, somewhere laying around in the bottom of a tool box, too many crimps that pulled apart with that style to care to count..

I prefer soldering myself but over the yrs have learned on this forum that there are too many folks who feel crimping is vastly superior, I am not one of those folks.. I will take a soldered connection anytime over crimps, crimps are for speed, not quality.. Spent too many yrs of my life repairing crimp connections.

Skibane

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Posted: 03/26/22 09:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LittleBill wrote:

the type that don't need a crimp, are these, they have the solder built into them. I have a set for emergency repair. they work well.

Solder/HeatShrink without a Soldering gun


In my experience - No, they don't. [emoticon]

ktmrfs

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Posted: 03/26/22 10:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skibane wrote:

LittleBill wrote:

the type that don't need a crimp, are these, they have the solder built into them. I have a set for emergency repair. they work well.

Solder/HeatShrink without a Soldering gun


In my experience - No, they don't. [emoticon]


correct. a properly soldered connection must first have a good mechanical connection, crimp, overlap twisted wires etc.

If you don't have proper knowledge about solder connections and techniques, rely on a crimp. Quality crimp tools make a consistently reliable mechanical and gas tight electrical connection with proper strain relief.


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LittleBill

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Posted: 03/26/22 10:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skibane wrote:

LittleBill wrote:

the type that don't need a crimp, are these, they have the solder built into them. I have a set for emergency repair. they work well.

Solder/HeatShrink without a Soldering gun


In my experience - No, they don't. [emoticon]


care to explain why?

profdant139

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Posted: 03/27/22 02:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP here: Someone asked about voltage -- this is 12 volt. And again, thanks for all of the advice.

I think I will have to buy a crimper -- not going to use pliers. I understand that solder is the gold standard, but only if the soldering is done by someone who is competent. I'm not -- I so seldom need to solder that I have not developed the skill.

The project I am working on will involve a total of four connections, and that will probably be my sum total for this year.


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