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 > Tire Load/Inflation Calculation

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Cummins12V98

on the road

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Posted: 03/29/22 08:20am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chart for all GY ENDURANCE tires

[image]


2015 RAM LongHorn 3500 Dually CrewCab 4X4 CUMMINS/AISIN RearAir 385HP/865TQ 4:10's
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JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 03/29/22 08:28am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Goodyear Tire and Rubber .... weighing RVs
Special Considerations

Unless trying to resolve poor ride quality problems with an RV trailer, it is recommended that trailer tires be inflated to the pressure indicated on the sidewall of the tire. Trailer tires experience significant lateral (side-to-side) loads due to vehicle sway from uneven roads or passing vehicles. Using the inflation pressure engraved on the sidewall will provide optimum load carrying capacity and minimize heat build-up.
.........................................................

Goodyear knows about tires used in a trailer position and they understand the folly of over tiring a trailer (above reserve capacity recommendations) as some rv owners seem hell bent on doing.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 03/29/22 08:28am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Based on 1,500# and adding 5spi that would be running 45psi at 1,6540# capacity.

CapriRacer has suggested adding 15% to the tire weight and that would put you at 1,725# and use 50psi at 1,760# capacity.

You already inflated the tire load a bit so IMHO either 45 or 50 will be just fine.

You have been running 50 for three years how even is the tread ????????

Mike134

Elgin, IL

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Posted: 03/29/22 08:34am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Based on 1,500# and adding 5spi that would be running 45psi at 1,6540# capacity.

CapriRacer has suggested adding 15% to the tire weight and that would put you at 1,725# and use 50psi at 1,760# capacity.

You already inflated the tire load a bit so IMHO either 45 or 50 will be just fine.
You have been running 50 for three years how even is the tread ????????


/\ /\ /\ THIS will tell you the right pressure.

Don't listen to the guy down the block, who talked to his cousin, who knew a guy that read it on the internet.


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Cummins12V98

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Posted: 03/29/22 08:36am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

Goodyear Tire and Rubber .... weighing RVs
Special Considerations

Unless trying to resolve poor ride quality problems with an RV trailer, it is recommended that trailer tires be inflated to the pressure indicated on the sidewall of the tire. Trailer tires experience significant lateral (side-to-side) loads due to vehicle sway from uneven roads or passing vehicles. Using the inflation pressure engraved on the sidewall will provide optimum load carrying capacity and minimize heat build-up.
.........................................................

Goodyear knows about tires used in a trailer position and they understand the folly of over tiring a trailer (above reserve capacity recommendations) as some rv owners seem hell bent on doing.


OK please tell me what YOU would do. I have about 4,500# on my GY "H" tires and the tires are not holding up with a rating of 4,805 @ 125psi. My next option is going to a "J" tire (not using Chinese made Sailun). What psi would you run as the "J" has a 6,005# capacity at 125psi.


I have a lot of REAL world experience using inflation charts getting better mileage out of my tires than most. Had ONE tire blow in WAYYY over one million miles driving and towing. Tire blew because I did not know the tread had come off.

MFL

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Posted: 03/29/22 08:37am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rfloyd99 wrote: "Should I run the rear tires at a higher psi on this 2,500 mile trip?, Especially since I'll have a little more weight in the back of the truck?"

Yes, I would use at least 40 psi in rears, to add stability, run cooler, and a small bit better mpg. Your 1500 would have come with soft sidewall tires. Using more psi will stiffen them up.

Didn't mean to go off topic of trailer tires, but TV tires are a big part of the whole rig towing experience.

Hope you have a great trip!

Jerry





rfloyd99

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Posted: 03/29/22 08:42am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins, good question. I've been running 55 psi (I check it often) and have pulled TT maybe 12-15,000 miles on these tires.

I'm headed over to the trailer now and will carefully inspect all four tires. Unless I have some uneven wear issues, it seems that the opinions here are leaning toward 50 or 55 psi being the best choice.

Now, any ideas about that tow vehicle psi?

JimK-NY

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Posted: 03/29/22 09:10am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you have a TPMS, you might want to try an experiment. Wait for a hot Summer day with the sun beating down on the pavement. Watch what happens to the tire pressures when you start out at the cold pressure corresponding to the maximum load rating. After the tires cool, try the same experiment starting out at the maximum inflation pressure. You will likely see the roughly the same final operating pressure and may even see operating pressures higher for the tires that started out with lower pressure.

Grit dog

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Posted: 03/29/22 09:19am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rfloyd99 wrote:

Cummins, good question. I've been running 55 psi (I check it often) and have pulled TT maybe 12-15,000 miles on these tires.

I'm headed over to the trailer now and will carefully inspect all four tires. Unless I have some uneven wear issues, it seems that the opinions here are leaning toward 50 or 55 psi being the best choice.

Now, any ideas about that tow vehicle psi?


Your truck, your trailer, with the info you've given, 50-55psi is perfect for the trailer. The slight change from 205-C to 215-D tires is not a cause to change much, if anything.
Rear wheels of the truck, I'd be in the 45psi range, possibly a bit higher if it's feeling squishy, to add stiffness and better handling to the @ss end of the truck.
Front tires, you're presumably not adding much weight, if any, from running bobtail. Possibly even a shade lighter unless you're going ham on the wdh weight transfer. Fronts I'd also be at about 45psi, possibly a bit higher as well, unless they feel "too" stiff.

This is presuming you're running P/XL typical 1/2 ton tires still. Wouldn't change much if running D or E tires, maybe a shade lower than P/XL if they feel too hard, due to thicker tire carcass having better lateral stability and less flex, comparatively.


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dedmiston

Coast to Coast

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Posted: 03/29/22 11:02am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:

If you have a TPMS, you might want to try an experiment. Wait for a hot Summer day with the sun beating down on the pavement. Watch what happens to the tire pressures when you start out at the cold pressure corresponding to the maximum load rating. After the tires cool, try the same experiment starting out at the maximum inflation pressure. You will likely see the roughly the same final operating pressure and may even see operating pressures higher for the tires that started out with lower pressure.


I don't use my TPMS much because it's not a very good unit, but the data is fascinating when it's actually working. It's surprising to me that the PSI is so much higher on the sunny side of the rig than the shady side.


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