Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Travel Trailers: Small trailer suggestions
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  Small TT's

 > Small trailer suggestions

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
trail-explorer

NM

Senior Member

Joined: 07/31/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/09/22 12:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skibane wrote:

In many states, RVs under 4000 lbs. GVW don't require a title to sell


I've never seen a trailer (RV, cargo, utility, etc) traveling down the highway without a license plate on it.

Which states allow trailers to go on public roads with a license plate (and title)?

trail-explorer

NM

Senior Member

Joined: 07/31/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/09/22 12:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wade44 wrote:

The Founder/COO of Ember worked for both Thor and Forest River which should tell you something. I doubt he has had some divine intervention regarding build quality.


FAKE NEWS alarm just went off.

The Founder of Ember is not a "he".

Details here if you don't believe me.

tommyznr

NR, WI

Senior Member

Joined: 12/29/2003

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/09/22 12:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

trail-explorer wrote:

Skibane wrote:

In many states, RVs under 4000 lbs. GVW don't require a title to sell


I've never seen a trailer (RV, cargo, utility, etc) traveling down the highway without a license plate on it.

Which states allow trailers to go on public roads with a license plate (and title)?


Wisconsin for one.


Tom

2017 GMC Sierra SLT, Max Tow package
2018 Grand Design Reflection 295RL

BackOfThePack

Fort Worth

Full Member

Joined: 08/03/2020

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/16/22 05:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mavapa wrote:

I’m a couple of steps away from buying a small trailer. I like what I have seen of the [email protected] 320 and 400, but they are pricey, new or used. Does anyone have a suggestion for a similar type? I want small, preferably narrow and light. I have looked around at several brands, but nothing has jumped out at me. I’m just wondering if I have overlooked anything.



— Why is “small” important?
(They don’t tow more easily).

— “Value” re money spent goes up in lineal feet increases.
(There’s a minimum, basically, and also a sweet spot for length/money)

— Inconvenience can weigh heavily after awhile.
(Constant hard use ups the wear rate of interior).

— Small capacities reduce boondocking ability
(Meaning increased energy use to go back/forth from
the store; propane supplier, get water; dump tanks, etc).

— Vast majority of its life it never moves. That IS the way to look at it.

The above is preparatory to asking:

1). How many years will you own it?

2). How many nights aboard annually?

— The “price” of the RV is the total number of nights aboard over those years.
Each night is worth = $$$

Shorter the period of ownership and lesser nights, the higher the cost of going camping.

The typical RVer spends too much as he keeps it five years and spends maybe thirty nights aboard annually. Then trades for another stapled cardboard box.

You’re say, age fifty and you plan to use this till you’re age 75?
(That’s a MUCH better starting perspective).

For a couple (even a family of five) a 28’ is a great size when it’s also quality. The type which will outlast your ownership. And there’s no need to buy new, much less buy over & over. My parents 1975 TT is still on the road with the second owners 17-years after they bought it. My folks had it thirty years.

“Used” (when you’re in earning years) just means an annual list of upgrades to tackle as time & budget allow. May not amount to much, or maybe you want to maintain the higher level of OEM quality.

TTs continue to go downhill from their 1960s quality. There are next to no true improvements save ducted A/C and distributed water-radiator heat.

The classic layout is rear full bath, beds going forward, and kitchen area with all appliances over the axles. The difference from there (length) was how big was the lounge area. (Dinettes separate are wasted space vs closets/cabinets). A full exterior awning package is what makes for camping versatility past “capacities”. One chases shirtsleeve weather (or, from 40F to 90F) to make the most of low thermal mass (all TT).

Greater clarity about NOW and SOME DAY will be of help. (Don’t discount being trapped by weather, days of rain, or being sick/injured. Don’t be FORCED out of the TT).


2004 555 CTD QC LB NV-5600
1990 35’ Silver Streak

Reisender

NA

Senior Member

Joined: 12/09/2018

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/16/22 08:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BackOfThePack wrote:

mavapa wrote:

I’m a couple of steps away from buying a small trailer. I like what I have seen of the [email protected] 320 and 400, but they are pricey, new or used. Does anyone have a suggestion for a similar type? I want small, preferably narrow and light. I have looked around at several brands, but nothing has jumped out at me. I’m just wondering if I have overlooked anything.



— Why is “small” important?
(They don’t tow more easily).

— “Value” re money spent goes up in lineal feet increases.
(There’s a minimum, basically, and also a sweet spot for length/money)

— Inconvenience can weigh heavily after awhile.
(Constant hard use ups the wear rate of interior).

— Small capacities reduce boondocking ability
(Meaning increased energy use to go back/forth from
the store; propane supplier, get water; dump tanks, etc).

— Vast majority of its life it never moves. That IS the way to look at it.

The above is preparatory to asking:

1). How many years will you own it?

2). How many nights aboard annually?

— The “price” of the RV is the total number of nights aboard over those years.
Each night is worth = $$$

Shorter the period of ownership and lesser nights, the higher the cost of going camping.

The typical RVer spends too much as he keeps it five years and spends maybe thirty nights aboard annually. Then trades for another stapled cardboard box.

You’re say, age fifty and you plan to use this till you’re age 75?
(That’s a MUCH better starting perspective).

For a couple (even a family of five) a 28’ is a great size when it’s also quality. The type which will outlast your ownership. And there’s no need to buy new, much less buy over & over. My parents 1975 TT is still on the road with the second owners 17-years after they bought it. My folks had it thirty years.

“Used” (when you’re in earning years) just means an annual list of upgrades to tackle as time & budget allow. May not amount to much, or maybe you want to maintain the higher level of OEM quality.

TTs continue to go downhill from their 1960s quality. There are next to no true improvements save ducted A/C and distributed water-radiator heat.

The classic layout is rear full bath, beds going forward, and kitchen area with all appliances over the axles. The difference from there (length) was how big was the lounge area. (Dinettes separate are wasted space vs closets/cabinets). A full exterior awning package is what makes for camping versatility past “capacities”. One chases shirtsleeve weather (or, from 40F to 90F) to make the most of low thermal mass (all TT).

Greater clarity about NOW and SOME DAY will be of help. (Don’t discount being trapped by weather, days of rain, or being sick/injured. Don’t be FORCED out of the TT).


Good post. But re why some of us go small. We are a one vehicle house and it can’t be a truck (has to fit in the garage). So some people choose a small trailer to be compatible with their tow vehicle.

Other reasons for us was storage (max 20 feet)
Easier on and off the ferries we use.
Manoeuvrable by hand on the site or in the driveway.

Small has certain advantages for some. We all camp and travel different of course.

toedtoes

California

Senior Member

Joined: 05/17/2014

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 05/16/22 12:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BackOfThePack wrote:


— Why is “small” important?
(They don’t tow more easily).

— “Value” re money spent goes up in lineal feet increases.
(There’s a minimum, basically, and also a sweet spot for length/money)


For many, small means they can store it at home versus paying for storage. Small means using their existing vehicle to tow rather than having to buy a fullsize truck. Those affect the perceived "value". In addition, every RV will cost money to maintain.

BackOfThePack wrote:


— Inconvenience can weigh heavily after awhile.
(Constant hard use ups the wear rate of interior).


This should be a consideration for any RV bought of any size. For many, the inconvenience of having to haul the trailer home from storage to stock it before a trip outweighs the "convenience" of having more space.


BackOfThePack wrote:


— Small capacities reduce boondocking ability
(Meaning increased energy use to go back/forth from
the store; propane supplier, get water; dump tanks, etc).


Many folks have no desire to boondock for weeks on end. Some, like me, dry camp and utilize a few water jugs and a grey tote during a stay.

BackOfThePack wrote:


— Vast majority of its life it never moves. That IS the way to look at it.


For many, travelling is a bigger part of RVing than staying in one spot. For them, towing a 28ft trailer and having to find places to park a 48+ft combination (and getting fuel) is far more inconvenient.

BackOfThePack wrote:


The above is preparatory to asking:

1). How many years will you own it?

2). How many nights aboard annually?

— The “price” of the RV is the total number of nights aboard over those years.
Each night is worth = $$$

Shorter the period of ownership and lesser nights, the higher the cost of going camping.

The typical RVer spends too much as he keeps it five years and spends maybe thirty nights aboard annually. Then trades for another stapled cardboard box.

You’re say, age fifty and you plan to use this till you’re age 75?
(That’s a MUCH better starting perspective).


This is true with any RV. Everyone should determine if they will use it enough to justify buying it. Many 28ft trailers sit rotting while smaller trailers get used. And fiberglass trailers like the OP is considering will hold up far better than any other RV.

BackOfThePack wrote:


For a couple (even a family of five) a 28’ is a great size when it’s also quality. The type which will outlast your ownership. And there’s no need to buy new, much less buy over & over. My parents 1975 TT is still on the road with the second owners 17-years after they bought it. My folks had it thirty years.

“Used” (when you’re in earning years) just means an annual list of upgrades to tackle as time & budget allow. May not amount to much, or maybe you want to maintain the higher level of OEM quality.

TTs continue to go downhill from their 1960s quality. There are next to no true improvements save ducted A/C and distributed water-radiator heat.


Again, show me a 28ft trailer with a better build quality than a Casita, Scamp, Escape, etc. The molded fiberglass shells far outlast any 1970s aluminum siding trailer.

BackOfThePack wrote:


The classic layout is rear full bath, beds going forward, and kitchen area with all appliances over the axles. The difference from there (length) was how big was the lounge area. (Dinettes separate are wasted space vs closets/cabinets). A full exterior awning package is what makes for camping versatility past “capacities”. One chases shirtsleeve weather (or, from 40F to 90F) to make the most of low thermal mass (all TT).

Greater clarity about NOW and SOME DAY will be of help. (Don’t discount being trapped by weather, days of rain, or being sick/injured. Don’t be FORCED out of the TT).


Awnings are not always practical. Most all of the campgrounds I've enjoyed have sites set up that are not conducive to awnings. In many cases, a simple shade canopy is far more useful as you can place it anywhere.

I'm not sure how rain, illness, etc, would force you OUT of the trailer? Folks should definitely consider being stick INSIDE a trailer for days due to those things.


One should definitely think before choosing and buying. But going big is not the answer for everyone. And what factors make the final choice will be different for everyone.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

goducks10

There

Senior Member

Joined: 02/22/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/16/22 12:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

trail-explorer wrote:

Skibane wrote:

In many states, RVs under 4000 lbs. GVW don't require a title to sell


I've never seen a trailer (RV, cargo, utility, etc) traveling down the highway without a license plate on it.

Which states allow trailers to go on public roads with a license plate (and title)?


Come to Oregon. In the last 45 years I've never licensed any of my utility trailers.

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/16/22 01:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

goducks10 wrote:

trail-explorer wrote:

Skibane wrote:

In many states, RVs under 4000 lbs. GVW don't require a title to sell


I've never seen a trailer (RV, cargo, utility, etc) traveling down the highway without a license plate on it.

Which states allow trailers to go on public roads with a license plate (and title)?


Come to Oregon. In the last 45 years I've never licensed any of my utility trailers.


yup, trailers under 1,800 lbs LOADED don't need registration or license in Oregon. it's the "LOADED weight that has gotten folks into trouble, common one is boat trailers. I also have had multiple utility trailers, some pretty good sized that I never plated or registered. Actually pretty rare to see a smaller utility trailer with plates on it around here.

Now don't know if any travel trailers would fit in the <1800lb loaded category, but then it might run into the requirement that travel trailers be registered and they get money out of you by the foot.


2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2015.5 Denali 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison passed on to our Son!


Skibane

San Antonio, TX

Senior Member

Joined: 11/09/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/16/22 04:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BackOfThePack wrote:


— Why is “small” important?
(They don’t tow more easily).


They do indeed tow more easily.

They weigh less and have a smaller frontal surface area, which means that they don't push the tow vehicle around as much, or work the TV's drivetrain as hard.

They're easier to maneuver into tight spaces, and they'll fit in 2 parking spaces at any grocery store.

"Tows like nothing's back there" is something no one EVER said about a 45 foot toy-hauler.

Quote:

— “Value” re money spent goes up in lineal feet increases.
(There’s a minimum, basically, and also a sweet spot for length/money)


Interior volume is just one of many ways to judge value. If you instead measure it by how much of your original purchase price is returned when you sell it, small RVs tend to win handily.

Quote:

— Inconvenience can weigh heavily after awhile.
(Constant hard use ups the wear rate of interior).


A small, well-made trailer will wear better than a large, poorly-made one.

Quote:

— Small capacities reduce boondocking ability
(Meaning increased energy use to go back/forth from
the store; propane supplier, get water; dump tanks, etc).


Small trailers require much less propane to heat, they have fewer lights and other 12 volt accessories to drain the house batteries, and they tend to eschew power-hungry appliances such as residential refrigerators, icemakers and dishwashers.

mavapa

Rome, Ga, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 11/08/2002

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 05/24/22 01:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Since my original post I have ordered a Ford Ranger. It has a 7500 lb tow rating, so I will definitely look for a smaller, lighter trailer. I’m still leaning towards a 320, but when the time comes, if I can find a good used Casita for a reasonable price, I might go that way.

Maybe I should have mentioned I have camped with my wife in a 27-foot Airstream, a 35-foot diesel pusher, a MB Sprinter-based class C, and another 27-foot trailer. I’m pretty familiar with the pros and cons of size, and since it’s likely I’ll be traveling by myself, a smaller RV is all I need. After all, my last “camping” was a foam mattress in the back of a pickup truck. Pretty much anything will be a real step up from that.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  Small TT's

 > Small trailer suggestions
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Travel Trailers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2022 CWI, Inc. © 2022 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.