Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Trying to figure out what trailers I can tow
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 > Trying to figure out what trailers I can tow

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uses1823

Apex, NC

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Posted: 04/14/22 06:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hello friends!

I'm looking for purchasing my first truck and then I'd like to shop for an RV. I have no preferences at the current moment, but I'm in love with Airstreams.

So, I've found the Ram truck:

2019 RAM 1500 LARAMIE CREW CAB 4X4 5'7" BOX
8-Speed Automatic 8HP75 Transmission
5.7L V8 HEMI MDS VVT eTorque Engine-3.92 Rear Axle Ratio

It has 7100 GVWR according to Ram's Towing Chart.

[image]

I'm trying to match this value with GVWR requirements for Airstreams (https://www.airstream.com/blog/the-complete-airstream-towing-guide/).

As I understand that I can tow only trailers that have less than 7100 GVWR in their charts? I'm I, right?

I need some real-world experience with these numbers, thanks! :-)

afidel

Cleveland

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Posted: 04/14/22 07:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

First no that is the GVWR of the truck, the maximum weight that the truck can weigh including fuel, people, cargo, and any transferred weight from the trailer. The most important stat for towing a trailer with a half ton is payload. On that chart it's listed as a maximum of 1,720 pounds. That's what a base model work truck in that configuration can hold as far as people, stuff in the bed, and transferred weight.

It's very unlikely that the actual vehicle you go to buy will actually have that maximum payload as every option added to the vehicle over the base takes away from it. You'll need to look at the yellow sticker in the driver's side door jamb to see what the actual capacity of the truck as it came from the factory is actually able to hold.

Now how that number is relevant, you need to add up the weight of your family and subtract 150 pounds from that, add a few hundred pounds for stuff in the bed (very few campers are going to have less than ~200 pounds of stuff in the bed, especially with the limited storage in an airstream), add 100 pounds for the weight distribution hitch, and finally 15% of the GVWR of the trailer as likely transferred weight.

IMHO do yourself a favor and if you're going to buy the truck first just go with a single rear wheel 1 ton as it will mean you can tow anything but the largest fifth wheels without worrying about it. I wish I had done that. If you're not willing to do that then I'd strongly recommend you buy or at least know exactly what trailer you plan to buy and then pick the truck based on that. I know that one of the families I follow on YouTube was completely maxed out with a family of 5, a 30' Airstream and a F250 Platinum because the diesel engine and Platinum package ate the payload down to about what the theoretical maximum cargo of the model you listed has (I believe it was a bit over 1,800 pounds).


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bgum

South Louisiana

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Posted: 04/14/22 07:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Take it from someone who has owned 5 Airstreams. With the truck you have picked out you should buy a 25 foot Airstream. Anything bigger will make for an uncomfortable towing experience due to to much trailer for the truck. Airstreams are very nice to tow and have good manners while being towed.

ken56

Tennessee

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Posted: 04/14/22 08:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel gives you good advice. If your heart is set on an Airstream then ...they are a heavy trailer. Check out the price difference between the 3/4 and 1 ton trucks. Diesel or gas, either way, your payload numbers are what are important. Tongue/pin weights of the trailers too. The dry weight numbers they give on trailers are pretty much useless because you are going to work with real world loaded and ready for camping numbers. Don't let any salesman tell you that you can pull ANYTHING with XXXX. The numbers tell the true story.

GrandpaKip

Flat Rock

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Posted: 04/14/22 08:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Buy the trailer first, then match a truck to it.
You also need to learn what all the weight ratings mean (and how to apply them) for a tow vehicle and a trailer.
It’s all basic math and can save you from buying the wrong truck which looks like you might be considering.
Payload is probably the most important for the truck.
Trailer dry weight, cargo capacity, gross weight, tongue weight (as a percentage of trailer weight).
Good luck.


Kip
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uses1823

Apex, NC

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Posted: 04/14/22 08:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you very much guys for your advice!

The yellow sticker says the towing capacity is 6280 lb.

I'll deep into the numbers.

TurnThePage

North ID

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Posted: 04/14/22 08:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't think that yellow sticker is an accurate representation of what the truck can tow. Of course, I haven't noticed where you said the truck had the tow package which includes a class IV hitch. My 2015 with the same engine, transmission, and gears, can tow well over 10,000 lbs. The caveat of course being the payload.

If you're dropping enough coin for an Airstream, I think I would lean toward a 3/4 ton too. Might as well have some wiggle room.


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Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 04/14/22 08:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:



It's very unlikely that the actual vehicle you go to buy will actually have that maximum payload as every option added to the vehicle over the base takes away from it. You'll need to look at the yellow sticker in the driver's side door jamb to see what the actual capacity of the truck as it came from the factory is actually able to hold.



Correct!

To add to afidel's comments, the "base" model of that truck is the absolute bare minimum cab and bed size and trim level with zero options and assuming no driver/passengers/fuel/cargo.

Each option you add adds weight to the overall vehicle, the added weight reduces the leftover available cargo.

The yellow sticker which typically is found around the drivers side door will give you the exact amount of available cargo you have.

The yellow sticker number takes the weight of the vehicle as it left the factory with all factory installed options with the factory tires and that is subtracted from the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) which is the maximum allowable weight the vehicle can be loaded.

There is some controversy with what that number includes but should include a full tank of fuel and at least 150 lbs for the driver. Some say 150lbs are also included for passenger. This weight is treated as cargo and is already subtracted from the available cargo.

So, it looks like this..

GVWR - Empty weight from factory - Full full tank - Driver - passenger = Yellow sticker cargo rating.

Now that you have the cargo weight from the yellow sticker you can now calculate the absolute max trailer you can tow..

For best stability trailer tongue weights (IE TW) should range from 10%-15% of the trailer weight, the higher TW you have the more stable the trailer will tow. Some folks like to use 12% to maximize just how heavy of a trailer they can tow, I like to be on the conservative side and use 15% assuming I will be loading for that weight.

Example, you have 1,000 lbs available cargo on the yellow sticker..

At 10% TW 1,000/.1 = 10,000 lbs
At 15% TW 1,000/.15= 6,666 lbs

Keeping in mind, that is the max GVWR of the trailer you can tow with your truck using only the yellow sticker number.

Add in more passengers and gear to the truck and you will have to reduce the available cargo which reduces your GVWR of the trailer you can tow..

camp-n-family

London, Ontario

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Posted: 04/14/22 09:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

afidel wrote:



It's very unlikely that the actual vehicle you go to buy will actually have that maximum payload as every option added to the vehicle over the base takes away from it. You'll need to look at the yellow sticker in the driver's side door jamb to see what the actual capacity of the truck as it came from the factory is actually able to hold.



Correct!

To add to afidel's comments, the "base" model of that truck is the absolute bare minimum cab and bed size and trim level with zero options and assuming no driver/passengers/fuel/cargo.

Each option you add adds weight to the overall vehicle, the added weight reduces the leftover available cargo.

The yellow sticker which typically is found around the drivers side door will give you the exact amount of available cargo you have.

The yellow sticker number takes the weight of the vehicle as it left the factory with all factory installed options with the factory tires and that is subtracted from the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating) which is the maximum allowable weight the vehicle can be loaded.

There is some controversy with what that number includes but should include a full tank of fuel and at least 150 lbs for the driver. Some say 150lbs are also included for passenger. This weight is treated as cargo and is already subtracted from the available cargo.

..


You’re both wrong here. Payload of a vehicle is simply the GVWR minus the empty weight calculated with full fluids. There is no allowance for driver or passenger in this. This is commonly mixed up with the Tow Rating which is the number that accounts 150lbs for a driver and passenger.


'17 Ram 2500 Crewcab Laramie CTD
'13 Keystone Bullet Premier 310BHPR
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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 04/14/22 09:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That truck will have a 10klb ish tow “rating”.
Bags and a good wdh for the squishy coil rear suspension and I’d stay in the 8klb or less trailer gvw realm.
There’s a bit more to it but that’s a good baseline.
Truck = great drivetrain. Rear suspension is the least favorable for heavy loads hence the additional caution on what would need to be added to combat tongue weight.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29

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