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valhalla360

No paticular place.

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Posted: 05/16/22 10:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Retired Enjoy Life wrote:

More specifics as requested.
The TT is a 2022 Jayco Jay Flight SLX 8 284BHS.
The sticker on the TT has the following weight information.

........

We have 4 children and 10 grandchildren with more on the way. So we are looking for a tow vehicle that will also be used on a daily basis and be able to accommodate seating as many grandchildren as possible. The minimum would be 6 people which could be accomplished with a truck. However, if we take more than 4 grandchildren a truck would not accommodate that. Hence why we are looking at a larger SUV. Traveling long distances with grandchildren crunched together would not be a pleasant experience. We would take them on long trips which could include traveling through mountains.

........


3/4 or 1 ton body on frame van with bench seats is the best answer. Something like the Chevy full size. The 3/4ton gets you around 2600lb payload and a 9600lb tow rating (make sure you check the details when ordering as it may require a tow package or other options to get the max ratings). If you need more payload the 1 ton version has a payload upwards of 3100lb.

Won't get great MPG but neither will the SUVs you listed.

I'm the youngest of 10 and that's what we always had.


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2021 Gray Wolf
Gemini Catamaran 34'
Full Time spliting time between boat and RV


Dadoffourgirls

China, MI USA

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Posted: 05/16/22 10:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Based on your descriptions, I second the one-ton Chevy Express as the dedicated tow vehicle. It would double as a grandkid bus. I have had an Express for the last 6 years. With the exception of not having 4wd, it makes a great tow vehicle, move to college, go on a brewery tour, and Saturday evening vehicle.

Fuel economy is not that bad in comparison to a 1500, and as good as a 3/4 or 1 ton pickup.


Dad of Four Girls
Wife
Employee of GM, all opinions are my own!
2017 Express Ext 3500 (Code named "BIGGER ED" by daughters)
2011 Jayco Jayflight G2 32BHDS

blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

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Posted: 05/16/22 11:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Glad two others said a 25 series van. Another excellent option for larger families. I didn't go that way due to using truck in landscape biz, along with using the trailer as a ski hut in the winter. 4wd and chains on truck and trailer were common needs getting in and out of a parking lot.

Don't quite me, I also believe Ford has an 8300 gvwr 150. Few and far between, but with an eco boost, also a good option.

Marty


92 Navistar dump truck, 7.3L 7 sp, 4.33 gears with a Detroit no spin
2014 Chevy 1500 Dual cab 4x4
92 Red-e-haul 12K equipment trailer

blt2ski

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Posted: 05/16/22 11:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A 3500 16 passenger 155" WB would be the real cats meow from a people hauler, payload option.
Finding these vans will not be fun!

Marty

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 05/16/22 11:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

Grit dog wrote:


You called?
It's fun to see the "you can't haul 4 fat people without exceeding the payload" comments which are (and I use this word cautiously) NEVER backed up by actual reasons why it's a bad idea. Just general supposition.
Just "because that's what the sticker says". Do you ever wonder how the rest of the world survives every day doing work with their half ton trucks? Or is your view so myopic that you literally have trouble even seeing your rear view mirrors?


Yep, the salesman telling you that you can pull what he's trying to sell, surely knows better than the engineer setting the ratings. [emoticon]

Fact is most pickups never do any heavy hauling or towing...the proverbial grocery getter. That's how they survive.

If you are over by 100lbs, will the axle instantly snap in half...probably not but it's not a good situation.


I don’t listen to salesman. Would have to buy something from a dealer first…lol.
But again, out comes the vague supposition.
Of course if you never haul anything, your axle and springs should figuratively last forever…
But the couple dozen half tons I’ve put a lot of hard miles on, the thousands that my employers have used in heavy construction and the millions that have survived hard work everywhere else might just maybe say different.
But I’m sure you have some experience to back up your claim? Lol


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 05/16/22 12:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP
The specifics help ALOT.
My advice comes from towing about anything you can hook to a light duty vehicle over the last 30+ years, including many things you shouldn’t and some that could only be categorized as stupid human tricks! Also a mechanic and civil/mechanical engineer.

1. New Tahoe/Burb/Expedition are out of the question. Biggest issue is none of them have a solid rear axle. Therefore your options for beefing up the suspension (which you WILL want/need to do with most any half ton chassis vehicle) are very limited to none. And IfS is not really designed with heavy loading in mind as a primary function.
2. Wheelbase. Yes it’s important. No it’s not AS important as some make it to be. But at a minimum Expe EL or Suburban and go back a few years and find a solid axle one. Even then they will be coil sprung but you have options and a decent wheelbase. This would be a bare minimum get by option imo. And at 34’ long tail wagging the dog is real. Skip the baby size suvs. (I’d tow with one but you probably would t like it)
3. Next step up heavy crew cab 1/2 ton with 6’ bed. I’d do this all day long with the right mods and have the closest thing to a suv for comfort.
4. If you have the budget to buy a $80k suv now then you realistically have the budget for anything you want. I’d get a crew cab HD truck and call it a day. Best compromise of all your wants and needs and you don’t have to take more than 3 grandkids. Make your kids haul them. Ever try to clean out the 3rd row area after the crumb munchers spill **** everywhere?
5. A van is the best option for Hauling the booger eaters and still being able to tow albeit with an inferior drivetrain compared to about any other option. But sucks for everything else.
And who the F wants to drive a short bus around town and to the grocery store and park it in the winter because traction sux? Vans are for people with too many kids and/or not enough money.
6. If you’re wanting to spend a lot of money, have no warranty and have your cake and eat it too, buy a Duraburb. If you want the same thing with less power and a lot less money find a cherry condition low mile old Excursion V10 or a 3/4 ton suburban. At least you can have leather seats, comfort, 4wd and haul 6 curtain climbers.

So you have lots of options.

valhalla360

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Posted: 05/16/22 01:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

valhalla360 wrote:

Yep, the salesman telling you that you can pull what he's trying to sell, surely knows better than the engineer setting the ratings. [emoticon]

Fact is most pickups never do any heavy hauling or towing...the proverbial grocery getter. That's how they survive.

If you are over by 100lbs, will the axle instantly snap in half...probably not but it's not a good situation.


I don’t listen to salesman. Would have to buy something from a dealer first…lol.
But again, out comes the vague supposition.
Of course if you never haul anything, your axle and springs should figuratively last forever…
But the couple dozen half tons I’ve put a lot of hard miles on, the thousands that my employers have used in heavy construction and the millions that have survived hard work everywhere else might just maybe say different.
But I’m sure you have some experience to back up your claim? Lol


Sorry for the miscommunication...I was including you with the salesmen saying the engineers don't know what they are doing.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 05/16/22 02:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:


Sorry for the miscommunication...I was including you with the salesmen saying the engineers don't know what they are doing.


Do you believe the "engineers" are responsible for setting the FHWA vehicle class weight ratings?

FWIW, all I'm hearing is you deflecting or talking around the actual subject.
BTW, it's ok to just say you don't know or understand and be that as it may, choose to use the "engineers" rating. It is a nice conservative number.

Dadoffourgirls

China, MI USA

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Posted: 05/16/22 03:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

...5. A van is the best option for Hauling the booger eaters and still being able to tow albeit with an inferior drivetrain compared to about any other option. But sucks for everything else.
And who the F wants to drive a short bus around town and to the grocery store and park it in the winter because traction sux? Vans are for people with too many kids and/or not enough money...


I would not say that the Express has inferior drivetrain. The 6.6 or 6.0 gas engine with 6 sp transmission and 3.42 is not inferior. I personally appreciate the 3.42 for the balance of fuel economy and capability.

Driving it around town is not much different than an HD crew cab. Way easier to load things into, like the slushie machine we take camping (or deliver for party rentals). Easy to get PVC pipe or 12 ft boards. A couple bags of salt in the back, good snow rated tires, and no issues in the winter.

Of course, Grit will never see the advantages.

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 05/16/22 03:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Vans are also for people who require interior cargo space PUs and SUVs cannot offer. A van with locking rear and the right tires offers adequate traction for summer on road towing; 4x4 towing is really only needed for off road towing and towing in the snow (which most don’t do). This comes from 20 years experience boondocking on dry and wet pastures.


Mark & Renee
Working Border Collies: Nell (retired), Tally (retired), Grant, Lee, Fern & Hattie
Wendy the Kangal (at home guarding our flock)
2001 Chevy Express 2500 Cargo (rolling kennel)
2007 Nash 22M

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