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Sjm9911

New Jersey

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Posted: 08/08/22 07:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cleanwood, sorry.
https://www.maxwarehouse.com/products/wood-clnr-clnwde-qt


2012 kz spree 220 ks
2020 Silverado 2500
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Formerly a pup owner.

covered wagon

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Posted: 08/08/22 10:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In the cabinet business we 'tone' the surface by mixing just a little bit of the stain into the finish coat as long as they are both oil and compatible. The toning works great because it has a tendency to darken with each coat and even out the color. Add more as needed while testing on a scrape piece of oak. Mix a little each time till you get a desired tone on the test piece.

Oak tends to not take stain as well as a soft wood so toning is a good way to get the desired look you want.

obie311

Aux Arcs

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Posted: 08/12/22 07:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the suggestions all.

Is Cleanwood a sanding sealer or just a cleaner like we used to use Prep-Sol when painting cars to get all the wax, grease, and handprints off the metal before painting?

Covered Wagon bear with me here as I want to take advantage of your knowledge, but I don't understand what you mean by "toning" the finish coat. Does that mean I would add some Miniwax 235 to a polyurethane satin top coat?

I'm missing a step here that the original furniture manufacturer did to make the finish more uniform. Is it possible that they used a toned sanding sealer first?

Luthiers use a sanding sealer on guitars, but maybe not for translucent finishes, maybe only paint. I found this warning on the internet:
Do not apply stain to the top of the sanding sealer. To work properly, wood stain needs to soak into the pores of the wood. Sanding sealer negates this process. The stain will sit on the surface and not be absorbed.

covered wagon

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Posted: 08/13/22 06:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What happens in our industry is the wood will not go dark enough for various reasons such as heavy dense woods like oak, sometimes it's the summer growth with harder grain, all will only accept so much stain so adding more stain to achieve the look we may want isn't going to happen. Sometimes it's the summer growth rings ending up showing too light as compared to the spring growth causing radical light and dark spots in the surface.

The solution is to find a top coat finish, most often lacquer, that will mix with a lacguer thinner base stain and slowly mix the two till you achieve a slight tone or tint that is effective in darkening the surface. Sort of like laying tinted glass as a top coat but, with the right color or tone we want. You want to add only a little at a time to the liquid finish and test what it does till you achieve the look your going to want but, don't go too dark right off the bat because with a toned top coat you can always go darker by adding a second or third coat. Each time you coat will tell you if you want to add another to gradually tone it darker.

Lacquer is nice because pro paint shops can help with the tone you want. Also 00 fine steel wool does wonders to a lacquered surface.

* This post was edited 08/13/22 06:33am by covered wagon *

Njmurvin

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Posted: 08/25/22 09:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I just refinished my grandkids' oak table/chairs set. I sanded to 220 and it wouldn't accept the stain very well. So I went back and resanded to 120/150 and it opened up the grain a bit better. You can also open the grain with water right before staining. I used pre-stain on the table but not on the chairs and honestly didn't notice any difference. It's true that it is more effective with softer woods. I agree it's really hard to match a color with oak - especially red oak because the red changes everything. I used a mahogany stain with red oak once and it really took on a dark red hue. You can always mix stains too. But be sure to keep track of your ratios if you do.

Along the lines of CoveredWagon's post above you can also try a stain/varnish combo (I think Minwax sells one). With that, the color is blended in with the finish and doesn't soak into the wood. So, each coat you apply makes it darker.


2020 Chevy Silverado 3500HD Duramax 4x4 Crew Cab Standard box

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