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ChrispyjCSLT22

Down South

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Posted: 08/26/22 01:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The 2023 NoBo 19.5 vs the Flagstaff e-pro 19FDS

Which is the better travel trailer? I'm new to this endeavor and have plans to make a purchase within 6 months. All perspectives welcome.

Cj

Lwiddis

Southern California :(

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Posted: 08/26/22 03:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would not pick a single axle TT. Only 30 gallons of fresh water seriously limits the ability of a family to dry camp. Heck, seriously would limit me.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2022 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, WindyNation 300 watt solar-Lossigy 200 AH Lithium battery. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist. 14 yr. Army -11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


afidel

Cleveland

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Posted: 08/26/22 04:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For me, the NoBo would be the obvious choice as having to constantly make and unmake the bed gets old. The fact that the NoBo has a full queen and a radius shower are the icing on the cake.


2019 Dutchman Kodiak 293RLSL
2015 GMC 1500 Sierra 4x4 5.3 3.42 full bed
Equalizer 10k WDH


Skibane

San Antonio, TX

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Posted: 08/26/22 06:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Both models are made by Forest River (mediocre build quality on a good day), and both models have slideouts (which add a lot of weight and mechanical complexity).

A few other brands to consider with better reputations for build quality:

Bigfoot
Casita
Escape
Scamp

If you're feeling spendy, also take a look at Oliver.

ChrispyjCSLT22

Down South

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Posted: 08/27/22 01:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:

For me, the NoBo would be the obvious choice as having to constantly make and unmake the bed gets old. The fact that the NoBo has a full queen and a radius shower are the icing on the cake.


I appreciate the response.. I do like the murphy bed and don't mind it.. I also should have been more clear on what I am looking for.. I'd like to have a TT that can run the AC off of the batteries and these 2 have optional paower pkgs that will allow this.. and these 2 seem to be the least expensive as well as I'd like a TT with the least amount of wood in the structure.

ChrispyjCSLT22

Down South

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Posted: 08/27/22 01:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Skibane wrote:

Both models are made by Forest River (mediocre build quality on a good day), and both models have slideouts (which add a lot of weight and mechanical complexity).

A few other brands to consider with better reputations for build quality:

***Link Removed***
***Link Removed***
***Link Removed***
***Link Removed***

If you're feeling spendy, also take a look at ***Link Removed***.



I appreciate your feedback.. I did like the escape and the Oliver but the rest were meh... I don't mind a slide out but my apologies for not being clear from the start...I'd like to have a TT that can run the AC off of the batteries and these 2 have optional paower pkgs that will allow this.. and these 2 seem to be the least expensive as well as I'd like a TT with the least amount of wood in the structure...

I take it you're not a huge fan of the Forest River Co?

afidel

Cleveland

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Posted: 08/27/22 01:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ChrispyjCSLT22 wrote:

afidel wrote:

For me, the NoBo would be the obvious choice as having to constantly make and unmake the bed gets old. The fact that the NoBo has a full queen and a radius shower are the icing on the cake.


I appreciate the response.. I do like the murphy bed and don't mind it.. I also should have been more clear on what I am looking for.. I'd like to have a TT that can run the AC off of the batteries and these 2 have optional paower pkgs that will allow this.. and these 2 seem to be the least expensive as well as I'd like a TT with the least amount of wood in the structure.


Nope, if you think you're going to run your Air-conditioning off a factory installed solar setup you will be very, very disappointed. A solar system capable of running even an 8k BTU AC unit for any length of time is going to be in the $7-10k range. All the factory system will do is run your lights, water pump, and 12V board for a 2-way fridge or extend the time you can run a 12V compressor fridge to a few days (maybe indefinitely if they can take a 2nd panel and you invest in better batteries).

Btw if your goal is to avoid wood check out used Livin' Lite trailers.

ChrispyjCSLT22

Down South

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Posted: 08/27/22 01:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:

ChrispyjCSLT22 wrote:

afidel wrote:

For me, the NoBo would be the obvious choice as having to constantly make and unmake the bed gets old. The fact that the NoBo has a full queen and a radius shower are the icing on the cake.


I appreciate the response.. I do like the murphy bed and don't mind it.. I also should have been more clear on what I am looking for.. I'd like to have a TT that can run the AC off of the batteries and these 2 have optional paower pkgs that will allow this.. and these 2 seem to be the least expensive as well as I'd like a TT with the least amount of wood in the structure.


Nope, if you think you're going to run your Air-conditioning off a factory installed solar setup you will be very, very disappointed. A solar system capable of running even an 8k BTU AC unit for any length of time is going to be in the $7-10k range. All the factory system will do is run your lights, water pump, and 12V board for a 2-way fridge or extend the time you can run a 12V compressor fridge to a few days (maybe indefinitely if they can take a 2nd panel and you invest in better batteries).

Btw if your goal is to avoid wood check out used Livin' Lite trailers.


here I go again not being clear, my apologies once again.. I do not expect to run a AC overnight non stop... just during the hot parts of the day, and for a few minutes in the evening...

I will check them out... I just have this fear/phobia about wood in the structure and as other folks have said, leaks is part of the TT life and I want to avoid rot, mold, mildew delam, etc..

Skibane

San Antonio, TX

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Posted: 08/27/22 03:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Choosing an RV based on its electrical equipment is a bit like choosing a car based on the color of its floormats...

Comparable electrical equipment can be installed in just about any RV, after the purchase - Typically, at just a small fraction of the cost.

RV manufacturers and their dealers tend to exaggerate the capabilities of just about every feature they offer: If they claim the A/C can be run for 4 hours before the batteries die, you can probably expect 1-2 hours in the real world.

This is another reason to do your own research, and decide what electrical equipment will actually work for you - rather than buying a specific RV simply because of the manufacturer's claims.

ChrispyjCSLT22 wrote:

and these 2 seem to be the least expensive as well as I'd like a TT with the least amount of wood in the structure...


All of the brands I suggested use molded fiberglass construction. There is virtually no wood used in them, other than interior cabinetry and a wood floor inside another fiberglass shell.

They're built like boats - Just two pieces of fiberglass joined together, with no seams on the roof or wall corners to leak.

The models you're considering have a continuous seam along the entire length of wherever one flat surface butts up against another - All 4 edges of every wall, plus the roof and underside.

If any of those seams ever leak, you've got water intrusion.

There is absolutely no comparison between the two construction methods.

* This post was edited 08/27/22 03:18am by Skibane *

theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 08/27/22 05:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you have never camped before, I suggest renting something for a weekend or two. Fall is a wonderful time to camp ! Take some extra blankets and an electric heater.

Second step, buy a lightly used 2 or 3 year old rig. Don't be too picky about the model. The point is to get experience with the layout/floorplan. After a year or so, you will have a better idea what you want.

Last, fall is a good time to shop for "last year" models or those lightly used ones. No one wants to store them for winter.

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