Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Towing: Towing in the snow
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Towing

Open Roads Forum  >  Towing

 > Towing in the snow

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev
rhagfo

Portland, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 07/06/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 12/02/22 06:36am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OP still hasn’t posted back if they went, or how it went.
Longest tow in snow for myself was two horse trailer from Butte, MT to just east of Spokane, WA back in about 1998. Done with an F250 4x4, no issues even coming down Lookout pass.


Russ & Paula the Beagle Belle.
2016 Ram Laramie 3500 Aisin DRW 4X4 Long bed.
2005 Copper Canyon 293 FWSLS, 32' GVWR 12,360#

"Visit and Enjoy Oregon State Parks"


ssthrd

Vancouver Island

Senior Member

Joined: 03/23/2016

View Profile



Posted: 12/02/22 03:15pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Longest for me was pulling our 30' TT from Wells, Nevada to Terrace, BC on our way home from Vegas. I was trying to get ahead of a huge storm which I knew was coming, but didn't make it past Wells. Had to hole up in a truck stop in Twin Falls, Idaho for a couple of days to wait out the worst of the storm, then north on I15 to Coutts, Alberta, then to Edmonton, Alberta, and to home in Terrace, BC. About 1500 miles I think.

I have to say that Western Canada could learn a thing or two about snow and ice control from you 'Mericans. Nevada, Idaho, and Montana crews were right on it. Got to the Alberta border and it was like night and day. It was like 2 tracks of ice for the last 1,000 miles or so. Took 3½ days from Coutts to Terrace.

Not many idiots and only a couple of white knuckle moments in the mountains, so not so bad.

Just had ta get home, ya know!!


2014 Keystone Laredo 292RL
2011 Palomino Maverick 800M
2018 GMC 3500HD, 4x4, 6.5' box, SRW, Denali, Duramax, Andersen
DeeBee, JayBee, and Jed the Black Lab

The hurrier I go the behinder I get. (Lewis Carroll)

JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/02/22 04:05pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ssthrd wrote:



I have to say that Western Canada could learn a thing or two about snow and ice control from you 'Mericans. Nevada, Idaho, and Montana crews were right on it. Got to the Alberta border and it was like night and day. It was like 2 tracks of ice for the last 1,000 miles or so. Took 3½ days from Coutts to Terrace.

Not many idiots and only a couple of white knuckle moments in the mountains, so not so bad.

Just had ta get home, ya know!!


In the hours of trying to miss the idiots I have often wondered if much of the money spent clearing roads would not be better spent educating people about how to prepare/stay home until roads clear. What makes you think you are so important that you must get to work? Push that paper next week.
I can remember the state transportation dept would dump piles of cinders along the side of hiways. Steeper the hill, piles closer together. Every car was expected to carry chains, bucket, and shovel. Can't get up the hill? Spread cinders. And if in town, the car in front of you was stuck, you got out and helped push them.

ssthrd

Vancouver Island

Senior Member

Joined: 03/23/2016

View Profile



Posted: 12/02/22 05:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree, although it seems like the older I get, the more I see the difference between educated and intelligent. Not to generalize, but wow! I had a disagreement with a Civil engineer awhile back when he stressed that the hypotenuse of a right angled triangle was shorter than one of the sides. On a battered wall, he argued that the difference in elevation was not the vertical distance, but the distance along the slope from bottom of wall to the top. And the top elevation was critical. The Pythagorean theorem is pretty basic, but I digress.......

I agree that education could make a difference, but a rigid budget over a life doesn't make sense. I realize that trying to budget for snow/ice control is a **** shoot, but that's what contingencies are for. It would be great if one could always have something in the pot for unforeseen events. A cap could be established and protected so that the money doesn't disappear to pay for something else if it is not used.

In the not too distant past, in anticipation of snow, brine was used in my area on the roads before an anticipated storm if it was not too cold to be effective. Wasn't always needed but was there when it was and gave the boys a good head start when the plows came out. Nowadays, proactive is not part of the program, because it's not a pay item in the contract. And naturally the owner has to look after his dollars while the contractor can't do work for free.

I'm out. Not sure where all that came from. I just have to vent now and then. Lol

ssthrd

Vancouver Island

Senior Member

Joined: 03/23/2016

View Profile



Posted: 12/02/22 06:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

No disrespect to engineers. This was a one time only occurrence with this one particular person.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/03/22 02:27am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

ssthrd wrote:



I have to say that Western Canada could learn a thing or two about snow and ice control from you 'Mericans. Nevada, Idaho, and Montana crews were right on it. Got to the Alberta border and it was like night and day. It was like 2 tracks of ice for the last 1,000 miles or so. Took 3½ days from Coutts to Terrace.

Not many idiots and only a couple of white knuckle moments in the mountains, so not so bad.

Just had ta get home, ya know!!


In the hours of trying to miss the idiots I have often wondered if much of the money spent clearing roads would not be better spent educating people about how to prepare/stay home until roads clear. What makes you think you are so important that you must get to work? Push that paper next week.
I can remember the state transportation dept would dump piles of cinders along the side of hiways. Steeper the hill, piles closer together. Every car was expected to carry chains, bucket, and shovel. Can't get up the hill? Spread cinders. And if in town, the car in front of you was stuck, you got out and helped push them.


Well, shoot. Lol
I can answer the question to your years of wonderment.
What you’re saying makes zero sense. And that’s why snowplow money doesn’t get spent on educating people to stay home…..hahaha.
Thanks for the laugh.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

dedmiston

Coast to Coast

Administrator

Joined: 01/26/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 12/03/22 03:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CR CRUISER wrote:

I have to tow my 27'fifth wheel about 80 miles tomorrow. It's calling for 6-8" of snow today and tomorrow. Any tips or tricks?
I have a GMC Sierra 4X4 with good winter tires. I do have cable chains.
Thanks in advance.


I think the OP’s needs either have or haven’t been met, but the comments are getting nasty (and some are just absurd).

CR CRUISER, you’re welcome to ask me to reopen your thread if you want to discuss it further.


2014 RAM 3500 Diesel 4x4 Dually long bed. AISIN trans & 4.10 rear. B&W RVK3600 hitch • 2015 Crossroads Elevation Homestead Toy Hauler ("The Taj Mahauler") • Hooligan #3

Toys:
  • 18 Can Am Maverick x3
  • 05 Yamaha WR450
  • 07 Honda CRF250X
  • 05 Honda CRF230
  • 06 Honda CRF230


This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev

Open Roads Forum  >  Towing

 > Towing in the snow
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Towing


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2023 CWI, Inc. © 2023 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.