Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Ordering F-350 7.3 CCLB SRW - how big of camper can I get?
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Ordering F-350 7.3 CCLB SRW - how big of camper can I get?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 10  
Prev  |  Next
Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 12:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

But mostly it boils down to if you’re comfortable or knowledgeable enough to trust what MaNY others do without issue. And if you’re one of those “don’t want to know it’s back there” folks or if you’re ok knowing that you’re driving a loaded truck.
A dually IS the ultra stable and comfy decision. Just depends how that feeling balances with the rest of your needs and preferences for the truck.


2016 Ram 2500, MotorOps.ca EFIlive tuned, 5” turbo back, 6" lift on 37s
2017 Heartland Torque T29 - Sold.
Couple of Arctic Fox TCs - Sold

terrybk

Central Coast California

Full Member

Joined: 02/01/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 06:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I see the order of importance as (descending):

1. Tire and rim ratings as measured against the axle weights. Most of the camper weight is on the rear tires.
2. Physical axle rating (the actual axle, not the RAWR). Most of the camper weight is on the rear bearings.
3. Rear axle weight rating (RAWR) - Most of the camper weight is here.
4. Front axle weight rating (FAWR)
5. Gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)

The gross (GVWR) is primarily a function of the tires, axle and frame/suspension. A dually and SRW of the same series (3500/350) almost always have the same frame. The rating goes up because of the tires. For a long time manufacturers capped the GVWR of SRW trucks at 9900lbs for registration and tax reasons. Throw two more tires on there and you get 11k+ rating. This is not a comparison of 2500/250 to 3500/350. That is a totally different topic.

I'm not suggestion or endorsing exceeding any rating but this is the list I considered when sizing my camper to my truck.

As far as "stability" of a dually, I've never been sure what that means. Most lean is in the springs/suspension not the number of tire. No doubt more tires increase number 5 above (GVWR) but they have little effect on sway and leaning or "stability." At least I have never experienced a difference. A big sway bar, air bags and good springs go a long way to limit leaning. If you need an extra tire out there to keep the camper and truck from falling over, you have bigger issues.

Certainly, if you are pushing the truck hard in a turn, more tires tend to give more friction on a dry surface and help keep the truck back end from swinging out. Try an over-sized trailer on an SRW in tight downhills if you want a high pucker factor. You can feel the rear want to get pushed sideways.

The labels on the camper and truck are a rough starting point but you have to weight everything - period. Everything else is a guess. The campers always weight more than their labels and the truck weight can vary too. It's hard to decide if a camper is "too much" before you buy it, but you can with some research get close enough to move forward or rule out a rig. Ask on the forums if anyone has actually weight there rig together and separately. You can learn a lot.

Scales - they are your best friend.

Edit: Added rim ratings as being as important as tire ratings.

* This post was edited 12/08/22 09:44pm by terrybk *


2005 Chevrolet 3500 SRW 4X4 LB/CC D/A
2006 Bigfoot 25C9.4LB
CEK0515 and a dog

jimh406

Western MT

Senior Member

Joined: 06/11/2006

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 07:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

terrybk wrote:

As far as "stability" of a dually, I've never been sure what that means. Most lean is in the springs/suspension not the number of tire. No doubt more tires increase number 5 above (GVWR) but they have little effect on sway and leaning or "stability."


All else being equal, shorter wider tires are more stable. DRW obviously has more width.

The suspensions are not the same. The spring packs are different on a DRW. The rear differentials are also different. Furthermore, they have different brakes. Both because the intended use is to haul more weight.

I started with a SRW, and changed to a DRW when I no longer needed a SRW as my daily driver to fit in parking spaces. With my SRW, I avoided carrying anything extra down to reducing the amount of water I carried. I have no issues any more with what I carry. I even towed a TT behind on a trip a few years ago over 500 miles each way.

By all means, buy a SRW if you want or need one, but let's not pretend they are equivalent or close to the same. They are literally made for different purposes. As noted, brakes are different, so stopping is incredibly different as well.


'10 Ford F-450, 6.4, 4.30, 4x4, 14,500 GVWR, '06 Host Rainer 950 DS, Torklift Talon tiedowns, Glow Steps, and Fastguns. Bilstein 4600s, Firestone Bags, Toyo M655 Gs, Curt front hitch, Energy Suspension bump stops.

NRA Life Member, CCA Life Member


Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 08:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

terrybk wrote:

I see the order of importance as (descending):

1. Tire ratings as measured against the axle weights. Most of the camper weight is on the rear tires.
2. Physical axle rating (the actual axle, not the RAWR). Most of the camper weight is on the rear bearings.
3. Rear axle weight rating (RAWR) - Most of the camper weight is here.
4. Front axle weight rating (FAWR)
5. Gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)

The gross (GVWR) is primarily a function of the tires, axle and frame/suspension. A dually and SRW of the same series (3500/350) almost always have the same frame. The rating goes up because of the tires. For a long time manufacturers capped the GVWR of SRW trucks at 9900lbs for registration and tax reasons. Throw two more tires on there and you get 11k+ rating. This is not a comparison of 2500/250 to 3500/350. That is a totally different topic.

I'm not suggestion or endorsing exceeding any rating but this is the list I considered when sizing my camper to my truck.

As far as "stability" of a dually, I've never been sure what that means. Most lean is in the springs/suspension not the number of tire. No doubt more tires increase number 5 above (GVWR) but they have little effect on sway and leaning or "stability." At least I have never experienced a difference. A big sway bar, air bags and good springs go a long way to limit leaning. If you need an extra tire out there to keep the camper and truck from falling over, you have bigger issues.

Certainly, if you are pushing the truck hard in a turn, more tires tend to give more friction on a dry surface and help keep the truck back end from swinging out. Try an over-sized trailer on an SRW in tight downhills if you want a high pucker factor. You can feel the rear want to get pushed sideways.

The labels on the camper and truck are a rough starting point but you have to weight everything - period. Everything else is a guess. The campers always weight more than their labels and the truck weight can vary too. It's hard to decide if a camper is "too much" before you buy it, but you can with some research get close enough to move forward or rule out a rig. Ask on the forums if anyone has actually weight there rig together and separately. You can learn a lot.

Scales - they are your best friend.


Essentially what he said. But I'll add rim load rating right up there with tires. Both of which are nowhere near their failure point at their rated loads. Regardless of what anyone says, tires and OE rims have a large factor of safety. It's a simple function of the liability of mfgs in the event of a failure (and years of "experience" doing stuff with trucks that should have had bigger trucks do it...lol). Not recommending grossly overloading, but in the context of this scenario, putting 8klbs (4500lb camper and 3500lb truck axle weight) on 3600lb rated rims and tires is 400lbs "over" or just over 10%. Again, not advocating it publicly for others, take it for what it's worth. lol

terrybk

Central Coast California

Full Member

Joined: 02/01/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 09:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What does "stable" mean?

terrybk

Central Coast California

Full Member

Joined: 02/01/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 09:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

terrybk wrote:

I see the order of importance as (descending):

1. Tire ratings as measured against the axle weights. Most of the camper weight is on the rear tires.
2. Physical axle rating (the actual axle, not the RAWR). Most of the camper weight is on the rear bearings.
3. Rear axle weight rating (RAWR) - Most of the camper weight is here.
4. Front axle weight rating (FAWR)
5. Gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)

The gross (GVWR) is primarily a function of the tires, axle and frame/suspension. A dually and SRW of the same series (3500/350) almost always have the same frame. The rating goes up because of the tires. For a long time manufacturers capped the GVWR of SRW trucks at 9900lbs for registration and tax reasons. Throw two more tires on there and you get 11k+ rating. This is not a comparison of 2500/250 to 3500/350. That is a totally different topic.

I'm not suggestion or endorsing exceeding any rating but this is the list I considered when sizing my camper to my truck.

As far as "stability" of a dually, I've never been sure what that means. Most lean is in the springs/suspension not the number of tire. No doubt more tires increase number 5 above (GVWR) but they have little effect on sway and leaning or "stability." At least I have never experienced a difference. A big sway bar, air bags and good springs go a long way to limit leaning. If you need an extra tire out there to keep the camper and truck from falling over, you have bigger issues.

Certainly, if you are pushing the truck hard in a turn, more tires tend to give more friction on a dry surface and help keep the truck back end from swinging out. Try an over-sized trailer on an SRW in tight downhills if you want a high pucker factor. You can feel the rear want to get pushed sideways.

The labels on the camper and truck are a rough starting point but you have to weight everything - period. Everything else is a guess. The campers always weight more than their labels and the truck weight can vary too. It's hard to decide if a camper is "too much" before you buy it, but you can with some research get close enough to move forward or rule out a rig. Ask on the forums if anyone has actually weight there rig together and separately. You can learn a lot.

Scales - they are your best friend.


Essentially what he said. But I'll add rim load rating right up there with tires. Both of which are nowhere near their failure point at their rated loads. Regardless of what anyone says, tires and OE rims have a large factor of safety. It's a simple function of the liability of mfgs in the event of a failure (and years of "experience" doing stuff with trucks that should have had bigger trucks do it...lol). Not recommending grossly overloading, but in the context of this scenario, putting 8klbs (4500lb camper and 3500lb truck axle weight) on 3600lb rated rims and tires is 400lbs "over" or just over 10%. Again, not advocating it publicly for others, take it for what it's worth. lol


Good point on rims. I'll insert that for anyone that sees it in the future. My 2005 3500 has steel wheels because the 2500 aluminum weren't rated high enough.

I was thinking about bouncing and the pressures the tires experience when 4000lbs comes down on a bounce. Agreed. The tires can handle a lot more.

terrybk

Central Coast California

Full Member

Joined: 02/01/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 09:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jimh406 wrote:

terrybk wrote:

As far as "stability" of a dually, I've never been sure what that means. Most lean is in the springs/suspension not the number of tire. No doubt more tires increase number 5 above (GVWR) but they have little effect on sway and leaning or "stability."


All else being equal, shorter wider tires are more stable. DRW obviously has more width.

The suspensions are not the same. The spring packs are different on a DRW. The rear differentials are also different. Furthermore, they have different brakes. Both because the intended use is to haul more weight.

I started with a SRW, and changed to a DRW when I no longer needed a SRW as my daily driver to fit in parking spaces. With my SRW, I avoided carrying anything extra down to reducing the amount of water I carried. I have no issues any more with what I carry. I even towed a TT behind on a trip a few years ago over 500 miles each way.

By all means, buy a SRW if you want or need one, but let's not pretend they are equivalent or close to the same. They are literally made for different purposes. As noted, brakes are different, so stopping is incredibly different as well.


I didn't remotely suggest SRW and DRW are the same. My point is the word "stability". It's never defined. More tires allows more weight but they don't make the roll/tilting any different. That's in the suspension.

jimh406

Western MT

Senior Member

Joined: 06/11/2006

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 12/08/22 09:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

terrybk wrote:

I didn't remotely suggest SRW and DRW are the same. My point is the word "stability". It's never defined. More tires allows more weight but they don't make the roll/tilting any different. That's in the suspension.


Stability is defined all over the internet, but the fact is SRWs and DRWs don't have the same suspension.

Google it or don't.

mellow

Salisbury, MD

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/09/22 07:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Once you go from an SRW to a DRW you will understand the stability aspect, it is a night and day difference in ride.

My first ride with my 1191 in the DRW my jaw was on the ground with the ride difference coming from an SRW with same camper.


2002 F-350 7.3 Lariat 4x4 DRW ZF6
2008 Lance 1191 - 220w of solar - Bring on the sun!

JRscooby

Indepmo

Senior Member

Joined: 06/10/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/09/22 08:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

BeMurda wrote:

Seems like I should order a DRW, I think I will go that direction and figure out how to live with it.


Hard to understand someone else’s thought process and frankly NOMB (none of my business). But I’d suggest if you can drive someone’s srw setup and get a feel for it first, that’s better than the potential buyers remorse of having a “hippy” truck that you otherwise don’t want or need.



I wonder what makes the truck harder to maneuver in tight places, extra length or extra width?
Super crew cab and 8 foot bed will be long enough to get stuck in both ditches at the same time. And I don't think the fenders will stick out past the camper. If, as OP stated, most of the use will be with camper loaded, why even think about not buying best setup for that use?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 10  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Ordering F-350 7.3 CCLB SRW - how big of camper can I get?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2023 CWI, Inc. © 2023 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.