Good Sam Club Open Roads Forum: Towing: "Dry Weight" Questions
Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Towing

Open Roads Forum  >  Towing

 > "Dry Weight" Questions

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
dodge guy

Bartlett IL

Senior Member

Joined: 03/23/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/14/18 06:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I never use the GVWR to see if I can tow it. I go by the dry weight plus 12-1500lbs. This will get me close to the actual ready to travel weight. In my case my trailers CCC is 4100lbs, no it’s not a toy hauler! It just has a lot of CCC. Dry is 7100lbs, GVWR is 11,200lbs.

Add 1500lbs to the dry weight that will get you your ready to travel weight.

And yes my dry weight stickers are all accurate!


Wife Kim
Son Brandon 17yrs
Daughter Marissa 16yrs
Dog Bailey

07 Cherokee 32B Dexter EZ Flex
02 Excursion 4X4 V-10 4.30 gear 5Star tuner Y-pipe mod Hellwig sway bar
Reese DualCam Prodigy brake controller

A bad day of camping is
better than a good day at work!


myredracer

Langley B.C.

Senior Member

Joined: 04/27/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/21/18 10:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I weighed our KZ TT on the way home from the dealer and it weighed 190 lbs more than the sticker on the inside of a cabinet door. We ordered some heavier options (solid surface counters, eg.) and I suspect their published UVW was an average or a baseline figure and they don't actually weigh each unit.

The weight of ALL cargo fully loaded for camping for two for our 29' TT came to only 555 lbs. That's all the usual cargo anyone would have like BBQ, chocks, sewer stuff, outdoor mat, snap-up brackets, kitchen stuff + food, stuff in bathroom, lots of misc. stuff under the bed, some books and DVDs, etc., etc... I would say allowing 1,000 lbs is more than ample unless maybe full-timing, going on a very long trip, have a large family and/or the TT is long.

People give all sorts of figures for the weight of cargo in the 1K-3K range. Some brands and models of TTs have a high CCC and some have low CCC. Using the GVWR is a good thing for shopping to be conservative and weighing your TT after fully loaded is a good idea to know where you're at. The weight of holding tank contents (8.3 lbs/gal.) can really throw things off and in some cases even put you over the GVWR. GVWR is a good number for determining what rating of WDH to get. Modifications & upgrades will add more weight (likely under 200 lbs). If towing with a tank of fresh water, some FW tanks are ahead of the axles and can have an impact on the TW and towing.


I hate CAPTCHA. CAPTCHA sux. CAPTCHA is evil. CAPTCHA needs fixing.

Gil, Deb & Dougal the Springer Spaniel
2014 KZ Spree 262RKS, Reese DC WDH
2009 F250 super duty, V10, 8' bed, Hawkshead TPMS


Cummins12V98

on the road

Senior Member

Joined: 06/03/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/21/18 12:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ya better have more truck than what you THINK.

MY DRV came to me 18,075#. The GVWR IS 21K. So one could estimate a max realistic pin of 5,250# @25% pin. Not oh no! My loaded RV weighs 23k with 25% pin at 5,750# or more.

Know your real world truck axle weights to determine what the rear axle can CARRY.


2015 RAM LongHorn 3500 Dually CrewCab 4X4 CUMMINS/AISIN RearAir 385HP/865TQ 4:10's
37,800# GCVWR "Towing Beast"

"HeavyWeight" B&W RVK3600

2016 MobileSuites 39TKSB3 highly "Elited" In the stable

2007.5 Mobile Suites 36 SB3 29,000# Combined SOLD

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/27/18 12:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BenK wrote:

Folks gotta remember that the OP is a newbie...

Old timers like me already made newbie mistakes and have that experience to lean on and also have experience on HOW2 manhandle the setup during a Mr Murphy encounter


This and IdaD responses are spot on and lead to my response in the other thread. GO get some windshield time with a trailer in tow. There is NO substitute for experience, no matter how little you're able to gain before the big trip. Learning curve should be fairly steep....IF you or your husband are at all mechanically inclined.
If you're the type of folks who consider an oil change or a flat tire a challenge and can't jump into a stick shift vehicle and know what all the pedals are for and how to work them, then getting some Practice towing is paramount to your comfort level on the trip.


03 Arctic Fox 860
07 Dodge 2500 deezul

RinconVTR

Wisconsin

Senior Member

Joined: 08/03/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/27/18 12:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

With LP tanks and battery removed, my Grand Design 2800bh tongue weight is still well over 100lbs more than the dry weight called out in advertisements and their web site.

We can make all sort of assumptions how the OEM's come up with this "magazine" dry weights, but I've never had one come close to those "dry weights" and "unloaded weights" no matter what I remove.

gmw photos

midwest

Senior Member

Joined: 12/11/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/04/18 01:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A popular recurring theme around here is to "go with the trailer GVWR".

My trailer actually weighs right at 4100 pounds. It's GVWR is 6000 pounds.
Using the logic of simply going by the GVWR would rule out some tow vehicles that in reality would be perfectly capable of towing this trailer.

I prefer to think in terms of "approximately dry weight, plus 1000 pounds or so". That seems to come out pretty close.

Cummins12V98

on the road

Senior Member

Joined: 06/03/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/04/18 02:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gmw photos wrote:

A popular recurring theme around here is to "go with the trailer GVWR".

My trailer actually weighs right at 4100 pounds. It's GVWR is 6000 pounds.
Using the logic of simply going by the GVWR would rule out some tow vehicles that in reality would be perfectly capable of towing this trailer.

I prefer to think in terms of "approximately dry weight, plus 1000 pounds or so". That seems to come out pretty close.


Maybe for YOU but you are the exception, the larger RV you have the more "STUFF" a person will add to their rig. Weekend warrior or full timer may make a difference but maybe not. The GVWR method is a guide, bottom line KNOW what your TV can CARRY when towing a 5er.

gmw photos

midwest

Senior Member

Joined: 12/11/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/04/18 02:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Agreed that in time we tend to "gain weight". I weighed this trailer and truck again this spring because I was resetting the WD hitch. Since the spring of 2012 to the spring of 2017, I've gain 100 pounds. Some of that was in the truck ( more tools ) and some in the trailer.

The point of my post is that it's best to know what the truck weighs, and know what the trailer weighs, rather than just making assumptions such as "go by GVWR of the trailer to determine if you have enough truck".

Some trailers really do weigh close to their stated GVWR. A few, like mine weigh considerably less. In my case, it's a small trailer that is equipped with two axles. Since they fit tandem 3K axles, they assigned a 6K GVWR on a trailer that really weighs 4K pounds ready to roll.

So in this case, brochure dry weight (3060) and yellow sticker weight ( 3327 pounds, it was within 150 pounds of what the trailer weighed, the day I brought it home ) were a LOT closer than "just going by GVWR".

One thing that is interesting to me as I follow these threads is that some posters try to take issues down to a one phrase fits all solution. It's almost as though folks seem to assume newbies are dumb as a box of rocks, and therefore we gotta make it simple for them.
Others go into great detail, making a seemingly basic thing ( go to the scale, get weighed ) seem like rocket science.

Somewhere in all of it may actually be some grains of wisdom.

As the man said: stay within your axle ratings. Hitch it well with a quality WD hitch. Wear your seat belt, and go drive somewhere and camp.

silverfz

mass

Full Member

Joined: 10/05/2014

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/05/18 09:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My trailer came as per online company resource with a Dry weight of 6800 lb. On pickup it weight was 6333. I guess the one on the manual was the fully loaded version with some outside kitchen option which I did not have.

the max I have seen my camper is 7500 on a long trip . My gvwr is 9600 lb. Not sure if I will get close as that trip we were carrying a lot.


2014 avenger 28 bhs
2008 Toyota tundra crew max
guarded by bear the mini dashound
running from payload police edition


tinner12002

Lafayette Ind

Senior Member

Joined: 10/14/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/09/18 07:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think the OP should be more worried about what the GVWR is than the dry weight.


2015 Ram 3500/DRW/Aisin/auto/Max tow/4.10s,Cummins, stock Laramie Limited--Silver
Tequila Sunrise 2012 Ultra Classic Limited
2018 Raptor 428SP

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Towing

 > "Dry Weight" Questions
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Towing


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2018 CWI, Inc. © 2018 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS