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 > PRK eye surgery?

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Jerseydevil

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Posted: 08/16/18 04:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Went for Lasik evaluation at 2 different locations. Both locations suggested PRK.
Anyone had this procedure? If so, positives, negatives?

miltvill

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Posted: 08/16/18 06:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have had both LASIK and PRK. I like the eye I had the LASIC better then the eye I had PRK in. Would not due PRK again. With LASIK they cut a flap and if your eye. If your eye sight changes then then they can open the flap and use LASIK again. I get a lot of pain sometimes in the eye I had PRK in.


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Jerseydevil

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Posted: 08/17/18 03:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

miltvill wrote:

I have had both LASIK and PRK. I like the eye I had the LASIC better then the eye I had PRK in. Would not due PRK again. With LASIK they cut a flap and if your eye. If your eye sight changes then then they can open the flap and use LASIK again. I get a lot of pain sometimes in the eye I had PRK in.


Good to know. Thanks.

Wanderlost

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Posted: 08/18/18 04:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

They should have told you why they recommended PRK over Lasik.

In my case, the evaluation showed a tiny thin spot in each cornea, so they would not do Lasik, as the corneal flap technique might make that spot unacceptably thin. PRK was their recommendation, pending the eye surgeon's final approval. This is laser eye surgery on the surface, so results are not normally instantaneous. I thought about it for a while, and then decided to go for it. Luckily, the eye surgeon agreed that I was an acceptable PRK candidate.

For a couple weeks before surgery, and about two weeks after, I took 1000 mg of Vitamin C. The day before, I started two sets of eye drops and a capsule.

On surgery day, they added an extra pain pill and some kind of anti-anxiety pill (not that I needed it, having made the decision, but that's just me). Then they added anesthetic drops and I waited in a dim room, with my eyes closed, until they took effect (about five minutes).

I had both eyes done by one of the top three surgeons in the region. The process took about two minutes per eye. One eye is taped closed, and the other taped open. My job was to look straight up at a red dot. Spousal Unit watched on a computer screen, and reported that they appeared to sand a small amount of the outer corneal layer off. I saw a white thingie move across my vision, followed by wet. Felt absolutely nothing. Then they used some kind of swab, and more liquid. Again, felt nothing. Then the red light became several red lights for a second or two. Then something else over my eye, which turned out to be a clear contact lens; it functions as a bandage. This eye was then taped closed and the other taped open. Same process, except I felt a slight stinging with one of the liquids, so they added more numbing drops and continued on. No sweat. The key is to remain very still and keep your gaze steady. I have nothing if not a dead steady gaze; it did come in handy in many an interview...

Process over, I had to wear special sunglasses, not only while Spousal Unit drove me home, but pretty much the whole day, while I was awake. I was supposed to go straight home and take a 3 to 4-hour nap, then start using all the eye drops prescribed. We stopped off and picked up lunch (I was ravenous), ate it at home, then I took a 2 ½-hour nap. Woke up, looked at the clock radio across the room, laid back down, and about 10 seconds later was wide awake. I had SEEN THE CLOCK, without squinting! No more nap time for me. No sir, it was put on the sunglasses and marvel at everything I could see in the distance. I’m pretty sure they tell patients to take a nap, knowing most won’t after seeing a clock so clearly.

Spousal Unit had to come get me at bedtime. I was still outside in the moonlight, marveling over the detail in leaf veins of various trees and shrubs.

I had 20/10 distance vision all day Tuesday and most of Wednesday, which is not at all normal in PRK. Wednesday and Thursday were hyper-sensitivity to light (normal), so I wore those sunglasses most of the time. Thursday was "looking through a very smeared windshield" day. The materials said Friday would be a smeary day, too, but it was not. Things were a little blurry, but nowhere near as blurry as without glasses before, and not at all smeary. That day was the first time I could see anything up close.

Discomfort? On Wednesday and Thursday, I'd occasionally feel the contacts, just as though I were wearing them for the first time. Been there, no big deal. On Wednesday morning, I made one mistake: was trying to rinse the soap off my forehead and tugged a little on my eyelids. Bad move--felt like I'd just been stabbed in both eyes. Stood very still and waited until my natural tears cooled everything down. But my forehead had to make do with a Wet One and a little alcohol gel until the contacts came out on Tuesday. The only other discomfort was in my hands. I washed them so many times before using the eye drops, that they cracked.

The ritual became wash hands, do eye drops, use medicated hand cream. The only other time I had any real pain was when the cat decided to cross my lap and his tail slapped me smack in the left eye. It was over quickly, but if you have a tailed cat, plan to be a little standoffish the first couple of days.

To make sure I didn't rub my eyes in my sleep, I bought a padded lavender-filled sleep mask with a Velcro strap. It worked beautifully. During the day, when I started feeling a little eye strain, I put it on and vegged for about 10 minutes in a chair. Worked great.

I had four kinds of eye drops and a capsule to deal with all the first week. Friday after surgery was the last capsule day. The next Tuesday, I dropped three eye drops and picked up a new one and used these two for about a month. I also received anesthetic drops, but only as a last resort, like if a contact fell out, and the surface wound came into contact with the eyelid. I turned that one in when my eye doctor removed the contacts on Monday the week after surgery. The contacts stayed in place 24/7, to keep the eyelid from contacting the surface wounds, and some of the eye drops were to ensure the contacts didn't dry out.

My vision continued to improve for the next three months, after which they evaluated and determined if any "enhancements" are needed. If so, the initial cost covers them, too. They evaluated me at six months, one year, and 18 months, too. I never needed any enhancements, although after six months, I needed 1.50 reading glasses.

And that's PRK. If you're lucky and can have Lasik, the results are instant and remain so. Eye drops are involved, but not to the extent necessary in PRK.

My eye doctor said I was so ahead of the normal PRK curve that I didn't fit into their "how it works" system, so my results may not be the same as another PRK patient.

Just in case you've read the website of Lasik/PRK horror stories, be advised that 99% of folks with complications had them because they failed to follow the prescribed regimen, or they were not good candidates, but went to a place that did them anyway. As paranoid as I am about my eyes, I followed the regimen to the letter, even though I didn't actually need to -- my eyes are naturally extremely moist and didn't dry out from the surgery, as some do. But it just felt so nice to drop those cold lubricating drops in my eyes (everything is kept in the fridge, as the coolness of the drops helps ease discomfort and promote healing).

I treated myself to new motorcycle goggles, since I couldn't use my prescription ones anymore. I have to use a pair with 100% UV protection and polarized lenses.

Meanwhile, all my prescription glasses were donated. When the presbyopia resumed, I bought commercial readers. 10 years later, they still do just fine.

If you want to go this route, and if my tale helps in your decision, you’re welcome.


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Jerseydevil

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Posted: 08/20/18 03:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wanderlost wrote:

They should have told you why they recommended PRK over Lasik.

In my case, the evaluation showed a tiny thin spot in each cornea, so they would not do Lasik, as the corneal flap technique might make that spot unacceptably thin. PRK was their recommendation, pending the eye surgeon's final approval. This is laser eye surgery on the surface, so results are not normally instantaneous. I thought about it for a while, and then decided to go for it. Luckily, the eye surgeon agreed that I was an acceptable PRK candidate.

For a couple weeks before surgery, and about two weeks after, I took 1000 mg of Vitamin C. The day before, I started two sets of eye drops and a capsule.

On surgery day, they added an extra pain pill and some kind of anti-anxiety pill (not that I needed it, having made the decision, but that's just me). Then they added anesthetic drops and I waited in a dim room, with my eyes closed, until they took effect (about five minutes).

I had both eyes done by one of the top three surgeons in the region. The process took about two minutes per eye. One eye is taped closed, and the other taped open. My job was to look straight up at a red dot. Spousal Unit watched on a computer screen, and reported that they appeared to sand a small amount of the outer corneal layer off. I saw a white thingie move across my vision, followed by wet. Felt absolutely nothing. Then they used some kind of swab, and more liquid. Again, felt nothing. Then the red light became several red lights for a second or two. Then something else over my eye, which turned out to be a clear contact lens; it functions as a bandage. This eye was then taped closed and the other taped open. Same process, except I felt a slight stinging with one of the liquids, so they added more numbing drops and continued on. No sweat. The key is to remain very still and keep your gaze steady. I have nothing if not a dead steady gaze; it did come in handy in many an interview...

Process over, I had to wear special sunglasses, not only while Spousal Unit drove me home, but pretty much the whole day, while I was awake. I was supposed to go straight home and take a 3 to 4-hour nap, then start using all the eye drops prescribed. We stopped off and picked up lunch (I was ravenous), ate it at home, then I took a 2 ½-hour nap. Woke up, looked at the clock radio across the room, laid back down, and about 10 seconds later was wide awake. I had SEEN THE CLOCK, without squinting! No more nap time for me. No sir, it was put on the sunglasses and marvel at everything I could see in the distance. I’m pretty sure they tell patients to take a nap, knowing most won’t after seeing a clock so clearly.

Spousal Unit had to come get me at bedtime. I was still outside in the moonlight, marveling over the detail in leaf veins of various trees and shrubs.

I had 20/10 distance vision all day Tuesday and most of Wednesday, which is not at all normal in PRK. Wednesday and Thursday were hyper-sensitivity to light (normal), so I wore those sunglasses most of the time. Thursday was "looking through a very smeared windshield" day. The materials said Friday would be a smeary day, too, but it was not. Things were a little blurry, but nowhere near as blurry as without glasses before, and not at all smeary. That day was the first time I could see anything up close.

Discomfort? On Wednesday and Thursday, I'd occasionally feel the contacts, just as though I were wearing them for the first time. Been there, no big deal. On Wednesday morning, I made one mistake: was trying to rinse the soap off my forehead and tugged a little on my eyelids. Bad move--felt like I'd just been stabbed in both eyes. Stood very still and waited until my natural tears cooled everything down. But my forehead had to make do with a Wet One and a little alcohol gel until the contacts came out on Tuesday. The only other discomfort was in my hands. I washed them so many times before using the eye drops, that they cracked.

The ritual became wash hands, do eye drops, use medicated hand cream. The only other time I had any real pain was when the cat decided to cross my lap and his tail slapped me smack in the left eye. It was over quickly, but if you have a tailed cat, plan to be a little standoffish the first couple of days.

To make sure I didn't rub my eyes in my sleep, I bought a padded lavender-filled sleep mask with a Velcro strap. It worked beautifully. During the day, when I started feeling a little eye strain, I put it on and vegged for about 10 minutes in a chair. Worked great.

I had four kinds of eye drops and a capsule to deal with all the first week. Friday after surgery was the last capsule day. The next Tuesday, I dropped three eye drops and picked up a new one and used these two for about a month. I also received anesthetic drops, but only as a last resort, like if a contact fell out, and the surface wound came into contact with the eyelid. I turned that one in when my eye doctor removed the contacts on Monday the week after surgery. The contacts stayed in place 24/7, to keep the eyelid from contacting the surface wounds, and some of the eye drops were to ensure the contacts didn't dry out.

My vision continued to improve for the next three months, after which they evaluated and determined if any "enhancements" are needed. If so, the initial cost covers them, too. They evaluated me at six months, one year, and 18 months, too. I never needed any enhancements, although after six months, I needed 1.50 reading glasses.

And that's PRK. If you're lucky and can have Lasik, the results are instant and remain so. Eye drops are involved, but not to the extent necessary in PRK.

My eye doctor said I was so ahead of the normal PRK curve that I didn't fit into their "how it works" system, so my results may not be the same as another PRK patient.

Just in case you've read the website of Lasik/PRK horror stories, be advised that 99% of folks with complications had them because they failed to follow the prescribed regimen, or they were not good candidates, but went to a place that did them anyway. As paranoid as I am about my eyes, I followed the regimen to the letter, even though I didn't actually need to -- my eyes are naturally extremely moist and didn't dry out from the surgery, as some do. But it just felt so nice to drop those cold lubricating drops in my eyes (everything is kept in the fridge, as the coolness of the drops helps ease discomfort and promote healing).

I treated myself to new motorcycle goggles, since I couldn't use my prescription ones anymore. I have to use a pair with 100% UV protection and polarized lenses.

Meanwhile, all my prescription glasses were donated. When the presbyopia resumed, I bought commercial readers. 10 years later, they still do just fine.

If you want to go this route, and if my tale helps in your decision, you’re welcome.


Thanks for sharing experience. My cornea is on thinner side which is why they suggested prk. Seems you were back to work in no time.

Wanderlost

Texas Hill Country

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Posted: 08/20/18 04:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was back to work the day after surgery, on Tuesday. Took Thursday off because of all the smeariness, then back to work on Friday. The following week worked as normal.

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