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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > The best upgrade for your TT

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gopherslayer

WI

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Posted: 08/13/22 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The best upgrade is ditching your Chinabomb tires. Chinabombs have a lot of squish and bounce. I tow with a 2500 Silverado and have a 28ft TT with an 8000# gross that came with load range C tires. Even with the 2500 there was some motion in the ocean and was very apparent in town on bumpy roads at 25-30 mph. Upgraded to Goodyear Endurance Load range D and it’s smooth sailing with very little movement on the bumpy roads and the highway is now glass smooth feeling. Handling around corners at speed on the highways is excellent. My wife has a lot more confidence towing now. 5 tires at $825 was money well spent.

Discussions are usually about the tow vehicle tires and shocks but the night and day difference on the trailer makes the money well worth it.

Lwiddis

Cambria, California area

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Posted: 08/13/22 08:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Why rag on Chinese made tires? Better to rag on under inflation, aged out, overloading and road hazards…the real causes of tire failure.

* This post was edited 08/13/22 08:18am by Lwiddis *


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, WindyNation 300 watt solar-Lossigy 200 AH Lithium battery. Prefer boondocking, USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state camps. Bicyclist. 14 yr. Army -11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 08/13/22 08:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gopherslayer wrote:

The best upgrade is ditching your Chinabomb tires. Chinabombs have a lot of squish and bounce. I tow with a 2500 Silverado and have a 28ft TT with an 8000# gross that came with load range C tires. Even with the 2500 there was some motion in the ocean and was very apparent in town on bumpy roads at 25-30 mph. Upgraded to Goodyear Endurance Load range D and it’s smooth sailing with very little movement on the bumpy roads and the highway is now glass smooth feeling. Handling around corners at speed on the highways is excellent. My wife has a lot more confidence towing now. 5 tires at $825 was money well spent.

Discussions are usually about the tow vehicle tires and shocks but the night and day difference on the trailer makes the money well worth it.


Not again..
[image]

If it makes YOU "feel better" then run with it.

Myself, Have used what every tires I can find which are readily available and never had drivability, stability or blow outs issues..

Perhaps you neglected to periodically add air and have been running the tires under inflated and the new tires the shop filled them for you?

Tires naturally lose 1-2 PSI per month..

Highly doubt your tire selection on the trailer made a difference, you can drive for miles with a flat ripped up tire and not even know it is dead..

nickthehunter

Southgate, MI

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Posted: 08/13/22 09:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The only way to “safely” get rid of those chinabombs, is to send them to me.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 08/13/22 10:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

gopherslayer wrote:

The best upgrade is ditching your Chinabomb tires. Chinabombs have a lot of squish and bounce. I tow with a 2500 Silverado and have a 28ft TT with an 8000# gross that came with load range C tires. Even with the 2500 there was some motion in the ocean and was very apparent in town on bumpy roads at 25-30 mph. Upgraded to Goodyear Endurance Load range D and it’s smooth sailing with very little movement on the bumpy roads and the highway is now glass smooth feeling. Handling around corners at speed on the highways is excellent. My wife has a lot more confidence towing now. 5 tires at $825 was money well spent.

Discussions are usually about the tow vehicle tires and shocks but the night and day difference on the trailer makes the money well worth it.


Not again..
[image]

If it makes YOU "feel better" then run with it.

Myself, Have used what every tires I can find which are readily available and never had drivability, stability or blow outs issues..

Perhaps you neglected to periodically add air and have been running the tires under inflated and the new tires the shop filled them for you?

Tires naturally lose 1-2 PSI per month..

Highly doubt your tire selection on the trailer made a difference, you can drive for miles with a flat ripped up tire and not even know it is dead..


Same here. My tires were dry rotted and put some Carlisles on . I have not heard from anyone that tows that they can "feel" their trailer bouncing more or that their tires are "squishy".
The first item on the pre-trip list is always tire pressure. How many do it? Look at the carcasses on the side of the road.
An under inflated tire is your worst enemy.
You could "feel" really good and add nitrogen @15 dollars a tire. [emoticon]

canoe on top

Denver, CO, US

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Posted: 08/13/22 12:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I tend to agree with the OP. I think good tires do track better. Also, notice that he went from a load range C to a D. I think a load range C would be marginal at best on a trailer that weight. I can see where the D would make a difference.My TT has 9,000 on the axles. I run LRE on 16 inch wheels. I've run the original Chinabombs, LTs and now, Goodyear Endurance. While it's not great, I can feel a difference in the tracking of different tires. The Endurance are the best in my experience.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 08/13/22 12:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

canoe on top wrote:

I tend to agree with the OP. I think good tires do track better. Also, notice that he went from a load range C to a D. I think a load range C would be marginal at best on a trailer that weight. I can see where the D would make a difference.My TT has 9,000 on the axles. I run LRE on 16 inch wheels. I've run the original Chinabombs, LTs and now, Goodyear Endurance. While it's not great, I can feel a difference in the tracking of different tires. The Endurance are the best in my experience.


Help me to understand what "difference in tracking" means. I installed new tires on my toyhauler, loaded the off road vehicle and off I went. I felt no difference in "tracking".
Installing new tires on a vehicle the difference is felt right away when you steer. How do new tires on a trailer influence tracking. And what exactly is tracking. There are no adjustable components on TT. Semi trailers I have adjusted alignment on. 1/2 inch towards the crown of the road.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 08/13/22 12:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

klutchdust wrote:

canoe on top wrote:

I tend to agree with the OP. I think good tires do track better. Also, notice that he went from a load range C to a D. I think a load range C would be marginal at best on a trailer that weight. I can see where the D would make a difference.My TT has 9,000 on the axles. I run LRE on 16 inch wheels. I've run the original Chinabombs, LTs and now, Goodyear Endurance. While it's not great, I can feel a difference in the tracking of different tires. The Endurance are the best in my experience.


Help me to understand what "difference in tracking" means. I installed new tires on my toyhauler, loaded the off road vehicle and off I went. I felt no difference in "tracking".
Installing new tires on a motor vehicle the difference is felt right away when you steer. How do new tires on a trailer influence tracking. And what exactly is tracking. There are no adjustable components on TT. Semi trailers I have adjusted alignment on. 1/2 inch towards the crown of the road.


gopherslayer

WI

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Posted: 08/13/22 01:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:

gopherslayer wrote:

The best upgrade is ditching your Chinabomb tires. Chinabombs have a lot of squish and bounce. I tow with a 2500 Silverado and have a 28ft TT with an 8000# gross that came with load range C tires. Even with the 2500 there was some motion in the ocean and was very apparent in town on bumpy roads at 25-30 mph. Upgraded to Goodyear Endurance Load range D and it’s smooth sailing with very little movement on the bumpy roads and the highway is now glass smooth feeling. Handling around corners at speed on the highways is excellent. My wife has a lot more confidence towing now. 5 tires at $825 was money well spent.

Discussions are usually about the tow vehicle tires and shocks but the night and day difference on the trailer makes the money well worth it.


Not again..
[image]

If it makes YOU "feel better" then run with it.

Myself, Have used what every tires I can find which are readily available and never had drivability, stability or blow outs issues..

Perhaps you neglected to periodically add air and have been running the tires under inflated and the new tires the shop filled them for you?

Tires naturally lose 1-2 PSI per month..

Highly doubt your tire selection on the trailer made a difference, you can drive for miles with a flat ripped up tire and not even know it is dead..


Always checked air before pulling the camper. Still do.

Gdetrailer

PA

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Joined: 01/05/2007

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Posted: 08/13/22 02:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gopherslayer wrote:

Gdetrailer wrote:

gopherslayer wrote:

The best upgrade is ditching your Chinabomb tires. Chinabombs have a lot of squish and bounce. I tow with a 2500 Silverado and have a 28ft TT with an 8000# gross that came with load range C tires. Even with the 2500 there was some motion in the ocean and was very apparent in town on bumpy roads at 25-30 mph. Upgraded to Goodyear Endurance Load range D and it’s smooth sailing with very little movement on the bumpy roads and the highway is now glass smooth feeling. Handling around corners at speed on the highways is excellent. My wife has a lot more confidence towing now. 5 tires at $825 was money well spent.

Discussions are usually about the tow vehicle tires and shocks but the night and day difference on the trailer makes the money well worth it.


Not again..
[image]

If it makes YOU "feel better" then run with it.

Myself, Have used what every tires I can find which are readily available and never had drivability, stability or blow outs issues..

Perhaps you neglected to periodically add air and have been running the tires under inflated and the new tires the shop filled them for you?

Tires naturally lose 1-2 PSI per month..

Highly doubt your tire selection on the trailer made a difference, you can drive for miles with a flat ripped up tire and not even know it is dead..


Always checked air before pulling the camper. Still do.


It called "Placebo Effect".

While THIS

"You may be familiar with the term “placebo” in reference to something called the placebo effect. The placebo effect is when an improvement is observed, despite an individual receiving a placebo as opposed to active medical treatment."

While link above is dealing more on the medical side of Placebos, the reality is sometimes a "change" to something causes on to mentally think there is an "improvement".

You made a "change", in your mind that "change" "improved" the outcome..

Changing a brand is not going to "improve" the handling or feel.

Changing the tire load range up isn't going to "improve" handling or feel of the trailer.

Be very aware, changing the load range up can have some unintended complications.

You can't simply air up to the same pressure as you did on the lower load rating.

If you do then you are now underinflating the tire for your load which will result in destroying the edges of your tires and faster heat buildup..

Inflating to the new load range sidewall pressure may be too much pressure which results in too stiff of tire and can hammer your trailer suspension to the point of breaking.

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